Reproductive Endocrinologists and Meteorologists Are More Similar Than You Think

Storm Nemo came and came and came and just when we thought it was over, it came some more. You may have been one of those folks who got less than predicted by meteorologists. I was not. We got it full blast. It's gorgeous. The forces of nature hit full on, here in Brookfield CT. I love the snow. And I did not lose power, phone or heat. We had plenty offood and were warm and cozy as the storm raged around us. 

 

 

Meteorologists have more in common with reproductive Endocrinologists than you think

The weather forecasters have been so right on target for the last several years. Have you noticed that? I did, with storm Nemo. The snow so high that opening the door was a struggle. And that shoveling out was necessary for the dog to be able to wade through to the yard. 

 

 

The meteorologists have been right when they predict snowstorms, hurricanes, tornadoes, tropical storms and they are right when they predict the sun shining through the clouds. They have been right a lot. Not every single time, not the exact amount of a snowfall or when it will land. Or exactly when it will start or stop. But right so much of the time that very rarely do I make fun of the school closings before a single snowflake falls anymore. 

 

 

They are right when they predict challenging weather conditions and they have been right about predicting stay outside all day conditions. They were right last summer when I was trying to decide which day to join friends to go swimming. The sun was out and beautiful all day, long into the evening. They were right in the fall when it was time to go and pick out a pumpkin or to go raspberry picking. Yes, in the last several years, I've had renewed respect for our sometimes maligned weather forecasters and meteorologists.

 

 

Why Are Reproductive Endocrinologists Like Meteorologists?

Infertility and fertility treatment. What on earth does the weather have to do with fertility treatment? Board certified reproductive endocrinologists remind me of meteorologists. Stay with me here for a moment. I promise, I'm connecting the dots. They predict, based on all different criteria, what your chances of becoming pregnant will be. They will go much further than that.Your fertility specialist will take all of your individual, personal, medical and physiolgical information and formulate the best plan possible on helping you become pregnant.

 

 

And here's a point to consider.We hear the bad news. We hear it really loud. We hear even iffy news, as bad news, really loud. Can we hear the good news? Think of it as the fabulous weather forecast. As the bright, shiny, warm days. None of us like to hear that our FSH is too high or our AMH is too low. None of us want to hear that our progesterone levels are up and down. That our periods and therefore our ovulation is irregular. Those are the predictions of clouds and rain and wind. 

 

 

Those are the things that we don't want to hear, don't want to know, don't want to be true. Like well trained, well supported, well educated meteorologists, board certified reproductive endocrinologists have tools at their disposal. And those tools do measure those things that aren't going well. Those tools also measure those things that are going well. We hear the bad news. 

 

 

I suggest that we also hear the good news. That our endometrial lining is the right thickness. That our estrogen levels are where they should be. That our follicles are growing, responding to the medications that we are taking. That our insurance has covered medications and treatment. That the Connecticut state mandate means that you can afford to do one more IUI. That our partners/spouses are finally on board to move on to IVF. That the IVF retrieval went well. These are just a few examples of good news. We believe the bad news when we hear it. Let's take time out to believe the good news when we hear it too.

 

 

 

 

Topics: reproductive endocrinologist, Weather, Force of Nature

Lisa Rosenthal

Lisa has over thirty years of experience in the fertility field. After her personal infertility journey, she felt dissatisfied with the lack of comprehensive services available to support her. She was determined to help others undergoing fertility treatment. Lisa has been with RMACT for eleven years and serves as Patient Advocate and the Strategic Content Lead.

Lisa is the teacher and founder of Fertile Yoga, a program designed to support men and women on their quest for their families through gentle movement and meditation.

Lisa’s true passion is supporting patients getting into treatment, being able to stay in treatment and staying whole and complete throughout the process. Lisa is also a Certified Grief Recovery Specialist, which is helpful in her work with fertility patients.

Her experience also includes working with RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association and The American Fertility Association (now Path2Parenthood), where she was Educational Coordinator, Conference Director and Assistant Executive Director.

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