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Fertility research and technology news, special events and announcements from the board-certified reproductive endocrinologists at Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut.

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Fertility Doctor Leads “IVF Basics for All” Workshop at The Center’s LGBTQ Family Building Expo in New York City

Posted by Reproductive Medicine Associates of CT Care Team on Thu, May 08, 2014

Norwalk, CT, May 08, 2014

On May 10, 2014 in New York City, Dr. Mark Leondires, Medical Director for Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) and GayParentsToBe.com, will lead a workshop called “IVF Basics for All” from 1:00 – 1:45 p.m. at The Center’s second annual Family Building Expo. GayParentsToBe.com, which is primarily an informational resource for the LGBTQ community, is sponsoring the Expo.

 

During “IVF Basics for All,” Dr. Leondires will explain how gay, lesbian and transgender individuals can plan for a family through the following topics: assisted reproductive technologies such as artificial insemination and in vitro fertilization (IVF), gestational carriers (also known as a surrogates), donor egg and donor sperm and fertility preservation. He will also explain now individuals with Hepatitis and HIV can have a genetically related child.

 

“I want attendees to leave the workshop knowing they can be parents, no matter what obstacles they think stand in the way,” says Dr. Mark Leondires, a board-certified reproductive endocrinologist. “I’m proud to share my personal experience as a gay dad who worked with gestational carriers, as well as my medical knowledge about assisted reproductive technologies.”

 

In addition to the workshop, GayParentsToBe.com will have a booth at the Expo where attendees can get written materials about family building options for LGBTQ community. Dr. Leondires will also be on hand to answer questions.

 

The Center presents its second annual LGBTQ Family Building Expo on Saturday, May 10, 2014 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 208 W 13th St, New York, NY. Admission, which includes a welcome lunch and workshops throughout the day, is free. For a complete schedule and other details, please go to:https://gaycenter.org/lgbtfamilyexpo.

 

 

About GayParentsToBe.com

GayParentsToBe.com is an informational resource and link to gay parenting services for the LGBTQ community. Through its partnership with Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT), GayParentsToBe.com provides full service care by working with an established professional network, including gestational carrier (surrogate), egg donor and sperm donor agencies to help LGBTQ persons build families. The GayParentsToBe.com Team is led by Medical Director Dr. Mark P. Leondires, a gay father who married his partner in 2011.

 

GayParentsToBe.com patients benefit from the experience and services of RMACT, which specializes in the treatment of infertility, including assisted reproductive technologies (ART) such as in-vitro fertilization (IVF) and Comprehensive Chromosomal Screening (CCS). RMACT, Fairfield County’s largest fertility clinic and egg donation center, is one of 11 leading In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) centers nationwide chosen by In Vitro Sciences to participate in its Centers of Excellence program. RMACT has offices in Danbury, Norwalk, Stamford and Trumbull, and affiliate New York fertility clinics serving Putnam and Dutchess counties. 

Topics: Family Building, Fertility Treatment

Fertility Authority Interviewed Dr. Joshua Hurwitz and Lisa Rosenthal

Posted by Katie Gaines on Thu, Mar 21, 2013

 

Dr. Joshua Hurwitz and Lisa Rosenthal were interviewed by Fertility Authority on the benefits of Yoga and Low Impact Exercise during fertility treatment. Check out the article titled "Finding Balance During Fertility Treatment" on FertilityAuthority.com.

 

Fertile Yoga Class 

 

 

Topics: Support, Fertility Treatment, Yoga, RMACT Doctors

Clinic Q&A: Talking Egg Freezing with RMA of CT

Posted by Jon Ward on Fri, Jan 11, 2013

Dr. Shaun Williams Reproductive Endocrinologist RMACT Fertility Doctor CT Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut is a fertility clinic with three locations in Connecticut and two in New York. Shaun C. Williams, M.D., a fertility doctor with RMA of CT, recently answered questions about egg freezing in Connecticut and New York.

How long has your RMA of CT been performing egg freezing?


RMA of CT has been performing egg freezing since 2010.

Who are you offering egg freezing services to? What types of patients?

We work with patients who have different reasons for freezing eggs. Some patients have been diagnosed with cancer or other medical conditions that require medical treatment that has the potential to damage their eggs and ovaries.

We also work with women in good reproductive health who are not ready to have a family and therefore elect to vitrify, or freeze, eggs. The American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) recently determined that the freezing and thawing of egg cells is now a proven method for preserving a younger woman's ability to have children, removing the technique's "experimental" label which has been in place since 2008.

What does your clinic consider the optimal age for egg freezing?  Do you have a cut-off age?

Fertility cannot be determined by one number — not a woman’s age, not even one test result. That is why we like to determine the best fertility plan for each patient individually. As is true with all available treatment options, a woman’s best chance to conceive using her own eggs is during the early part of her reproductive life. Just as pregnancy rates following IVF begin to decline after age 35, so too does the likelihood of success when frozen eggs are thawed and used during an IVF attempt. The “ideal” age for egg freezing is when eggs are the healthiest, between the ages of 18 and 24. However, not many individuals have the forethought or resources to consider this option at this early age. But women who understand that pregnancy chances decrease rapidly after 40, being able to preserve eggs between the ages of 35 and 40 may give them a better chance to conceive in the future if the circumstances for pregnancy are not yet appropriate.

To help understand what an individual’s likelihood of success would be, we take into consideration many factors, including:

  • A woman’s reproductive history
  • Her family members' reproductive history, and
  • Evaluations of current ovarian function, such as hormonal markers (FSH, AMH) as well as ultrasound determinations of egg quantity (antral follicle counts)


The process of egg freezing is relatively quick — typically, egg retrieval occurs during the menstrual cycle of the month following a patient’s first visit. After a patient has completed a consultation with a fertility specialist and had all of her questions answered, she can start preparing for egg retrieval. First, the patient will have an ultrasound of her uterus and have blood tests taken, including FSH, which is taken on day 3 of a woman’s menstrual cycle. During the next three weeks, the patient will take birth control pills and fertility medications. By her next menstruation, she is ready for egg retrieval. It is especially important for cancer patients or anyone delaying medical treatment to understand that egg retrieval will take place about three to seven weeks from her first doctor’s appointment.

Although we do not have a cut off age, a woman’s reproductive health and her chances of having a successful pregnancy decrease significantly after 35 years of age. We counsel our patients based on this clinical data and the results of her diagnostic testing.

Once eggs are frozen, where are they stored?

We store vitrified eggs on site at our location in Norwalk, CT. Our embryology lab is extremely sophisticated, with continuous monitoring, security and power source.

How long do you feel eggs can be stored safely?

There is not enough clinical data to know exactly how long vitrified eggs will remain viable, but it generally thought that they will last many, many years. The vitrification process freezes eggs without crystallization, so theoretically they could be viable indefinitely.

Is there a cut-off age that you recommend for women to have eggs thawed, fertilized and transferred in a cycle?

Women who have eggs stored should monitor their reproductive health regularly and maintain good health overall. Before eggs are transferred, patients should undergo diagnostic testing, including a pelvic exam and assessment of her uterus. ASRM recommends that patients who are over 45 years old should have a more thorough evaluation, including an assessment of heart function and risk of pregnancy-related diseases. Above the age of 50, women should consider using a gestational carrier (or surrogate) during advanced treatments.

Has your fertility clinic had live births from frozen eggs?

The number of patients who are interested in freezing their eggs has been relatively small compared to other fertility treatments; however, we are encouraged by the positive results that these patients have had. RMA of CT currently has a patient who is pregnant from eggs that she froze a few years ago, and I have personally been involved in over 70 pregnancies using frozen eggs, both from donors and fertility preservation.  

With the recent change in ASRM’s classification, we anticipate more women being interested in vitrification.

What is the price range for freezing eggs, and what does that range cover?

Freezing eggs at RMA of CT costs about $10,000. This includes cycle monitoring, retrieval and lab fees, anesthesia and cryopreservation of oocytes for the first year.

Cancer patients should also look into their options through Fertile Hope, a non-profit that provides information and resources for cancer patients. Fertile Hope runs a program called Sharing Hope, which works with companies and clinics to arrange for discounted services and donated medications for eligible female cancer patients.

What are the reasons a woman would NOT be a good candidate for freezing her eggs?

Before any of our patients puts time and resources into freezing their eggs, we conduct diagnostic testing to ensure that the patient and her eggs are healthy. This testing tells us if a woman’s ovarian reserve is healthy and if she is a good candidate for egg vitrification. Basically, a woman’s likelihood of conceiving with frozen eggs is no better than her current likelihood of conceiving with IVF. If factors are identified that may indicate a lower likelihood of success with a fresh IVF cycle, these factors still apply when the eggs are thawed. The likelihood of success in the future must be weighed against the cost of the treatment to determine if this process is right for a woman to consider.

What is the most exciting aspect of ASRM lifting the experimental label? How do you think this will change the face of fertility treatment?

ASRM’s decision and the recent advances in vitrification can enable patients to fulfill their family dreams in the future; however age is still an important factor to consider. This Practice Committee of the ASRM based their decision on a report titled “Mature Oocyte Cyryopreservation,” which examined nearly 1,000 published papers. The report urges caution, stating: “Marketing this technology for the purpose of deferring childbearing may give women false hope and encourage women to delay childbearing. Patients who wish to pursue this technology should be carefully counseled.”

By lifting the experimental label, we hope that more women will consider freezing eggs as part of their family planning in their 20s. This change in thinking could open the door for many patients who delay having a family. This also allows more options for choosing donor eggs through frozen donor egg banking, similar to the prevalent and well accepted use of donor sperm through donor sperm banks. This can allow more women to pursue pregnancy through oocyte donation at a lower cost.
 
What should a woman look for in a clinic that does egg freezing?

First and foremost, ask what types of certification the practice has for its embryology lab and doctors. I recommend working with board-certified reproductive endocrinologists.

The most advanced form of egg freezing is called vitrification, and it has the greatest success rates. Ensure that any practice you are considering working with is experienced with the vitrification process, which involves cooling eggs to a very cold temperature very rapidly. The antiquated method of “slow-freezing” is still used by many clinics for embryos and sperm, but this method is unacceptable for egg freezing.  And be sure that the vitrified eggs are stored on-site through a system that is protected with back up power and 24-hour monitoring.

Contact us by clicking here if you are interested in egg freezing.

Thank you to Fertility Authority for conducting this interview.

Topics: reproductive endocrinologist, Fertility Treatment, RMACT Doctors, Freezing

RMACT Fertility Doctor is “Top Doc” for Excellence in Infertility Treatment

Posted by Jon Ward on Tue, Jan 08, 2013

Dr. Spencer Richlin Recognized by Peers

Ct Fertility Doctor | Fertily Specialist Fairfield County For the second consecutive year, Dr. Spencer Richlin, Surgical Director and Fertility Specialist with Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT), has been honored by his peers by being rated a “Top Doc.” Castle Connolly’s 2013 list of Fairfield County’s Top Doctors of will appear in the January/February issues of Fairfield Living, Greenwich, New Canaan-Darien, Westport and Stamford magazines, all of which are published by Moffley Media and are on stands now. 

 

“I feel privileged to be in the reproductive endocrinology field during a time when so many new advances are making it possible to help patients realize their dreams of a family,” says Dr. Richlin, who is the Division Chief of Reproductive Endocrinology and Fertility at Norwalk Hospital along with his responsibilities at RMACT.  “And to have this work recognized by my peers through this award is simply amazing.”

 

Moffley Media’s list is compiled by the renowned healthcare research firm Castle Connelly Medical Ltd., which conducts a rigorous, peer-reviewed assessment of local doctors by their peers.

 

Dr. Richlin is board certified in both Reproductive Endocrinology and Obstetrics and Gynecology. He is a member of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.  He has published several articles and co-wrote with his RMACT partner, Dr. Mark Leondires, the fertility chapters in a new textbook titled Avoiding Common Obstetrics and Gynecology Errors, published by Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

 

Dr. Richlin received his undergraduate degree in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley, and his medical degree from the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. He completed two internships, one in Emergency Medicine and one in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Richlin served his residency at Stamford Hospital in Stamford Connecticut from 1995-1999, where he was named Berlex Best Teaching Resident.  He then completed his subspecialty fellowship in reproductive endocrinology and infertility at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia.

 

Within the reproductive endocrinology field, Dr. Richlin’s main interests are reproductive surgery, in vitro fertilization (IVF), donor egg pregnancies and a cutting edge technology called Comprehensive Chromosome Screening (CCS), which safely evaluates biopsied embryos prior to transfer. Dr. Richlin takes a personal interest in his patients, and finds fertility preservation for cancer patients especially rewarding.

 

About Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT)

RMACT specializes in the treatment of infertility, including assisted reproductive technologies (ART) such as intrauterine insemination (IUI), in-vitro fertilization (IVF), and Comprehensive Chromosomal Screening (CCS). RMACT, Fairfield County’s largest fertility clinic and egg donation center, is one of 11 leading In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) centers nationwide chosen by In Vitro Sciences to participate in its Centers of Excellence program. RMACT has offices in Norwalk, Danbury and Stamford, and affiliate New York fertility clinics serving Putnam and Dutchess counties. RMACT also offers infertility treatment financing and support services through RMACT Integrated Fertility & Wellness Center, such as nutrition counseling, massage therapy, psychological counseling, acupuncture and yoga.

 

The RMACT team of Board-Certified Reproductive Endocrinologists includes Drs. Mark P. Leondires, Spencer S. Richlin, Joshua M. Hurwitz and Cynthia M. Murdock. All physicians are members of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) and the Fairfield County and Connecticut Medical Societies. RMACT’s IVF laboratory is accredited by the College of American Pathologists (CAP), and CLIA; other accreditations include the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) and the American Institute for Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM). For more information visit http://www.RMACT.com or find us on Facebook.

Topics: reproductive endocrinologist, reproductive medicine, Financing Infertility Treatment, Fertility Treatment, RMACT Doctors

CT Fertility Practice Presents Clinical Study Findings at Annual Infertility Conference

Posted by Tally Jacobs on Fri, Nov 09, 2012

CT Fertility Practice Presents Clinical Study Findings at Annual Infertility Conference

Data from Five RMACT Studies Will Be a Part of American Society of Reproductive Medicine

NORWALK, CT (November 9, 2012) – Doctors from Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) shared data from five of its recent infertility studies during the annual American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) Conference held last month. ASRM is considered to be the premier society for the infertility field, and only the most prestigious studies are included in the education program for attending doctors and reproductive health professionals.

 

RMACT’s five papers that are being presented at 2012 ASRM are:


o Vitrified Blastocysts Yield Equivalent Pregnancy Rates as Compared to Fresh Blastocysts, Dawn A. Kelk, PhD


o Age Related Probability of Having a Chromosomally Normal Embryo Transfer Following Trophectoderm Biopsy and Comprehensive Chromosome Screening, Dawn A. Kelk, PhD


o Pregnancy Rates of Vitrified Blastocysts Are Equal to Fresh Day 6 Transfers for Euploid Embryos Following Comprehensive Chromosomal Screening, Dawn A. Kelk, PhD


o Elevated Progesterone Level The Day Prior Oocyte Correlates with Diminished Clinical Pregnancy Rates, Dawn A. Kelk, PhD


o HgbA1c Screening in a General Infertility Population, Joshua M. Hurwitz, MD

 

The collective work from RMACT and Dr. Kelk will be presented during a day-long postgraduate program called “State-of-the-Art Micromanipulation Techniques in the IVF Lab” for embryologists and physicians. By examining results – based on both the successful and the failed IVF cycles – coming out of RMACT’s embryology lab, Dr. Kelk was able to share findings about advanced techniques such as Comprehensive Chromosomal Screening (CCS) and vitrified embryo transfer. The RMACT data show that fresh and vitrified blastocysts have equivalent viability and that there is no compromise in pregnancy rates with this advanced freezing technique. In fact, embryo freezing may lead to improved pregnancy rates due to better synchrony between the embryo and the uterus. Out of 514 patients, frozen embryo transfers had a 67 percent clinical pregnancy rate, compared with 60.2% for fresh embryos.

 

In addition, RMACT’s work verifies and expands upon previously shown data that patients under 35 years old are more likely to achieve pregnancy and have fewer chromosomal disorders than older patients. Patients under 35 years old who went through IVF and CCS, where embryos are biopsied and tested for chromosomal abnormalities, had at least one embryo without abnormalities that they were able to transfer 100 percent of the time. For patients 43 years old or older, this rate dropped to 33.3 percent; for all 124 patients in the study, the rate was 75 percent.

 

Additionally, Dr. Hurwitz’s paper, HgbA1c Screening in a General Infertility Population, examines the link between diabetic and pre-diabetic patients and infertility. While the topic needs further investigation, the study shows that 24.7 percent of all patients in the study had elevated glucose levels consistent with pre-diabetes. Furthermore, 8.0 percent of these patients had blood sugar levels above the recommended limit for safety in pregnancy according to the American College of OBGYN guidelines. Hormone metabolism and production is greatly influenced by metabolic conditions; this study supports the idea that reproductive endocrinologists should include blood tests for conditions such as high cholesterol and diabetes as part of their diagnosis to increase fertility as well as optimize pregnancy health.

 

About Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT)


RMACT specializes in the treatment of infertility, including assisted reproductive technologies (ART) such as intrauterine insemination (IUI), in-vitro fertilization (IVF), and Comprehensive Chromosomal Screening (CCS). RMACT, Fairfield County’s largest fertility clinic and egg donation center, is one of 11 leading In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) centers nationwide chosen by In Vitro Sciences to participate in its Centers of Excellence program. RMACT has offices in Norwalk, Danbury and Stamford, and affiliate New York fertility clinics serving Putnam and Dutchess counties. RMACT also offers infertility treatment financing and support services through RMACT Integrated Fertility & Wellness Center, such as nutrition counseling, massage therapy, psychological counseling, acupuncture and yoga.

 

The RMACT team of Board-Certified Reproductive Endocrinologists includes Drs. Mark P. Leondires, Spencer S. Richlin, Joshua M. Hurwitz and Cynthia M. Murdock. All physicians are members of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) and the Fairfield County and Connecticut Medical Societies. RMACT’s IVF laboratory is accredited by the College of American Pathologists (CAP), and CLIA; other accreditations include the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) and the American Institute for Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM). For more information visit http://www.RMACT.com or find us on Facebook.

Topics: pregnancy, ASRM, Fertility Treatment

New Study Finds Weekly Fertility Shots Work | Dr. Richlin Weighs In

Posted by Cara Murray on Tue, Jul 03, 2012

In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) and FSH

A recent study has found that weekly injections of fertility hormones, known as FSH or follicle stimulating hormone, which are used to stimulate the ovaries during in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment, work as well and are as safe as daily injections.  

 

In June, Fertility Authority reported on this recent finding and interviewed Dr. Spencer Richlin, Reproductive Endocrinologist at Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT).

 

These weekly injections have been approved for use in Europe since 2010, and CT Infertility Specialist Dr. Richlin expects the FDA to grant approval for its use in the U.S. within the next year or two.  

 

Administering FSH once weekly as opposed to once daily adds convenience and reduces stress for those undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) fertility treatment.  The Fertility Doctors at RMACT will continue following this research with interest.  

 

Read the full article from Fertility Authority below:

Weekly Fertility Shots Work as Well as Daily, Says Study

by Leigh Ann Woodruff, June 20, 2012

Fertility Medications

When a woman undergoes in vitro fertilization (IVF), typically she gets a daily shot of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) in order to stimulate the ovaries and help produce multiple eggs. Now a new study has found that long-lasting weekly injections of fertility hormones are as safe and effective as the daily injections.

 

The longer-lasting FSH is called corifollitropin alfa, (brand name ELONVA®) and it has been approved for use in Europe since 2010. Corrifollitopin alfa has the ability to initiate and sustain multiple follicular growth for an entire week, so a single subcutaneous injection may replace the first seven injections of any conventional daily recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH) preparation for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation.

 

"In a typical IVF cycle, patients take seven to 11 days of shots," says Spencer Richlin, M.D., a fertility doctor and Surgical Director of Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut. "This new weekly injection will allow them to take one to three shots. Patients who don't like needles, find the shots uncomfortable, or have trouble being in a private place at the same time everyday will appreciate the convenience of a weekly shot."

 

The weekly injections are not available in the United States yet. "We are waiting for FDA approval," Dr. Richlin explains. "We ssume they will be here in the next 1 to 2 years."

 

Researchers compared weekly and daily hormone injections in a Cochrane systematic review, which is a systematic review of primary research in human health care and health policy and is internationally recognized as the highest standard in evidence-based health care. The scientists included data from four trials involving 2,335 people in their review and found no difference in pregnancies or serious side effects between the two regimens. The review showed that women given medium doses of the new long-lasting hormone on a weekly basis are equally likely to become pregnant and are no more likely to have a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy than those receiving daily FSH injections.

 

"Based on the study, there is no question that when it is approved in the U.S., reproductive centers will use it," Dr. Richlin says.

 

In a statement, the study authors said that further research is needed to establish whether corifollitropin alfa is as effective in women who respond poorly to fertility hormones and those who hyper-respond and produce higher than expected numbers of eggs. In addition, there is limited information about patient satisfaction with the longer-acting FSH. According to Merck & Co., Inc., the makers of the drug, the most frequently reported side effects during treatment with ELONVA in clinical trials are Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS), pelvic pain and discomfort, headache, nausea, fatigue and breast complaints (including tenderness). These side effects are found with daily FSH injections, too.

 

"For some patients, daily shots are stressful," Dr. Richlin says. "Anything we can do to make the journey easier is very important to our patients."

 

Topics: Fertility Treatment

TV Features RMA Infertility Specialist on IVF Single Embryo Transfer

Posted by Cara Murray on Thu, Jun 14, 2012

WTNH News 8 | In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) and Single Embryo Transfer

On Wednesday, June 13, 2012, in a special TV segment about in vitro fertilization (IVF) and single embryo transfer, News 8 (WTNH) featured Board-Certified Reproductive Endocrinologist Dr. Spencer Richlin, Infertility Specialist at Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT).  When building your family through IVF treatment, there are a few key factors to consider in determining whether single embryo transfer is the best choice, explained Dr. Richlin.  Age, reproductive history, and fertility treatment history are all relevant variables in predicting pregnancy success rates.

Comprehensive Chromosome Screening (CCS) in CT at RMACT

When single embryo transfer is not the best option for pregnancy, Dr. Richlin discussed a relatively new technology that is available to avoid multiple births, called Comprehensive Chromosome Screening or CCS, a type of genetic screening for embryos.  CCS enables fertility doctors to identify and select embryos that do not contain abnormalities, thus achieving higher implantation rates and fewer pregnancy losses.  RMACT is the only fertility center in Connecticut offering this new technology to patients.

 

Visit News 8, WTNH, for the full article.  Watch the video below:

A second look at IVF: wtnh.com

 

Topics: CCS - Comprehensive Chromosomal Screening, Fertility Treatment

Dr. Richlin: Top Docs 2012 Award for Fertility Treatment Excellence

Posted by Robin Mangieri on Fri, Jan 20, 2012

Stamford Fertility Doctor Spener RichlinSTAMFORD, CT January, 20, 2012 - Dr. Spencer Richlin, Surgical Director and Fertility Specialist with Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT), has been honored by his peers by being rated one of Castle Connolly’s “2012 Top Docs.” The list of Fairfield County's outstanding doctors will appear in the January/February issues of Fairfield Living, Greenwich, New Canaan-Darien, Westport and Stamford magazines, all of which are published by Mofley Media.

Best Fertility Doctors 2012: Dr. Spencer Richlin:

“To be recognized by my peers is truly an honor because I respect their work and their opinions,” says Dr. Richlin, who is the Division Chief of Reproductive Endocrinology and Fertility at Norwalk Hospital along with his responsibilities with RMACT. “But the most rewarding part of my work is partnering with patients to help them build the families of their dreams.”

Mofley Media’s list is compiled by the renowned healthcare research firm Castle Connelly Medical Ltd., which conducts a rigorous, peer-reviewed assessment of local doctors.

Board-Certified Fertility Specialist. Experienced & Compassionate

Dr. Richlin is board certified in both Reproductive Endocrinology and Obstetrics and Gynecology. He is a member of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. He recently co-wrote with his RMACT partner, Dr. Mark Leondires, the fertility chapters in a new textbook titled Avoiding Common Obstetrics and Gynecology Errors, published by Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

Dr. Richlin received his undergraduate degree in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley, and his medical degree from the University of Southern California’s School of Medicine. He completed two internships, one in Emergency Medicine and one in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Richlin served his residency at Stamford Hospital in Stamford Connecticut from 1995-1999, where he was named Berlex Best Teaching Resident. He then completed his subspecialty fellowship in reproductive endocrinology and infertility at Emory University’s School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia.

Within the reproductive endocrinology field, Dr. Richlin’s main interests are reproductive surgery, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and a cutting edge technology called Comprehensive Chromosome Screening (CCS), which safely evaluates biopsied embryos prior to transfer. Dr. Richlin takes a personal interest in his patients, and finds fertility preservation for cancer patients especially rewarding.

Find the Top Doctors Jan/Feb 2012 Issues on newstands now:

Stamford Fertility Doctor CT Dr. Spencer Richlin  Westport Fertility Doctor Weston Wilton Top Doctor Award 2012  Greenwich Fertility Doctor CT Top Doctor Award 2012

 

Fairfield Fertility Doctor Top Doctor Award 2012 Darien Fertility Doctor New Canaan Rowayton Top Doctor Award 2012 

 

About RMACT 
Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) specializes in the treatment of infertility, and is one of 11 leading In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) centers nationwide chosen by In Vitro Sciences to participate in its Centers of Excellence program. With Connecticut fertility clinics and egg donation offices in Norwalk, Danbury and Stamford, and affiliate New York fertility clinics serving Westchester, Putnam and Dutchess counties, our team of Board-Certified Reproductive Endocrinologists offer a wide range of infertility treatments from ovulation induction and intrauterine insemination (IUI) to the most advanced assisted reproductive technologies including in-vitro fertilization (IVF), egg donation and its own cutting-edge procedure called Comprehensive Chromosomal Screening (CCS), a form of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). RMACT offers individualized infertility treatment plans in a patient-focused and supportive environment. Support services, such as, psychological counseling, acupuncture and yoga are also available through RMACT Integrated Fertility & Wellness Center, as well as infertility treatment financing.

The RMACT team of fertility doctors includes Drs. Mark P. Leondires, Spencer S. Richlin, Joshua M. Hurwitz and Cynthia M. Murdock. All physicians are members of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) and the Fairfield County and Connecticut Medical Societies. RMACT’s IVF laboratory is accredited by the College of American Pathologists (CAP), and CLIA; other accreditations include the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) and the American Institute for Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM). 

Topics: Top Fertility Doctors, Fertility clinic, reproductive endocrinologist, Best Doctor Award, Fertility Treatment, RMACT Doctors

Starting a Family as a Single Female | June 16

Posted by Robin Mangieri on Tue, Jun 14, 2011

Single Female ParenthoodSingle Women Pursuing Parenthood

Please join us for a discussion group and social gathering for Single Women pursuing parenthood…or seriously thinking about it!

This is a chance to meet other women to talk about the decisions, anxieties, excitement and opportunities that you will face along the way to becoming a mother.

Possible topics may include:
•    choosing a sperm donor
•    deciding to adopt
•    talking to friends, family, and co-workers
•    creating a strong support system
•    what do I tell my child?


This group is free of charge.  It is facilitated by Lisa Tuttle, PhD, clinical psychologist.  If you have any questions, please call Lisa      at (203) 852-9099.  

Light refreshments will be served.
RSVP to Cori at (203) 750-7492

Thursday, June 16th, 6:00-7:30 p.m.
10 Glover Ave, Norwalk, CT

Topics: Parenthood, Support, Single Female, Fertility Treatment

The Future of Genetic Embryo Screening Has Arrived: CCS

Posted by Robin Mangieri on Sat, Feb 05, 2011

Every few years, a reproductive technology comes along that revolutionizes infertility treatments for patients. Comprehensive Chromosome Screening (CCS) is, arguably, one such technology. Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut in partnership with Dr. Richard Scott of Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey (www.rmanj.com) are proud to announce that we are the only fertilty center in Connecticut who can offer patients access to this important tool.


New Haven's WTNH-TV station focused on CCS in a recently aired story by Jocelyn Maminta:

What Is CCS (or Comprehensive Chromosome Screening)?

Aneuploidy is the term used to describe any embryo with either too many or too few chromosomes.   Most people are not aware that aneuploidy is the cause of greater than 60% of miscarriages, as well as the most likely reason that  patients do not get pregnant from an in-vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle.


The purpose of CCS is to analyze, select and transfer only embryos that do not have abnormalities in their number of chromosomes. Screening embryos in advance can help achieve higher implantation rates and fewer pregnancy losses, particularly for women 35 or older, couples with multiple-failed IVF cycles or implantation failure, and couples with repeated miscarriages.


Potential CCS Advantages: Technologies Screen Embryos for All 23 Pairs of Human Chromosomes

The more traditional technique of identifying aneuploidy in IVF embryos was performed with an older technology called fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH has many technical drawbacks including the fact that it can only study, at most, 11 chromosome pairs out of all 23 pairs of chromosomes.   Therefore 12 or more chromosomes, then, are not examined, resulting in only partially screened embryos which can lead to miscarriages or infants born with chromosomal disorders.    Additionally, FISH requires removal of only a single cell on day 3 of development.  This greatly decreases the accuracy of the testing and may even harm the embryo as there are only 6-10 cells at that stage of development.  In fact, several well-regarded research studies have shown that using FISH on day 3 embryo does not improve outcomes over traditional IVF.


Conversely, during CCS, we obtain 5-10 cells on a day 5 or 6 embryo called a blastocyst.  Biopsying the embryo at a more advanced cell stage dramatically increases the accuracy of this testing and minimizes potential damage that the biopsy can cause on the embryo because it has several hundred cells by then.


Another advantage to CCS is that we can greatly reduce the odds of a couple having multiple pregnancies (twins or triplets). It arms clinicians with the knowledge that they are transferring the most chromosomally fit embryo, therefore precluding  the need to transfer multiple, unscreened  embryos in the hope that one will be healthy enough to create an ongoing pregnancy and a healthy baby.


For more information about CCS, or to speak with one of our board-certified reproductive endocrinologists and infertility specialists, please contact us.   We’re here to help.

Topics: PGD, Testing, CCS - Comprehensive Chromosomal Screening, Fertility Treatment, RMACT Doctors