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Path To Fertility Blogger Lisa Rosenthal  

Lisa Rosenthal has over twenty-five years of experience in the fertility field, including her current roles as Coordinator of Professional and Patient Communications for RMACT and teacher and founder of Fertile Yoga, a class designed to support, comfort and enhance men and women's sense of self. Her experience also includes working with RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association and The American Fertility Association, where she was Educational Coordinator, Conference Director and Assistant Executive Director

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Getting Pregnant with PCOS - Diet & Exercise Tips

  
  
  

Dr. Hurwitz & Nutritionist Carolyn Gundell Talk About PCOS Treatment

 

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is the most common hormonal disorder of women in their reproductive years. This medical condition causes infertility by preventing women to ovulate. 

 

In this video, Dr. Joshua Hurwitz and nutritionist Carolyn Gundell of Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut give advice to those trying to get pregnant with PCOS. They discuss how diet and exercise are key to treating infertility issues with PCOS. Let us know if you would like to learn more about RMACT's Nutrition Program to treat PCOS.

 

 

 

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PCOS Parents Event - Special Team Effort to Help With Your Teenager

  
  
  

PCOS Help - Forum for Parents

pcos support ribbonCalling this one out to parents of daughters who are struggling with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome). If your daughter is struggling, then chances are, you are too. If you’ve ever felt like you were stepping on eggshells with your daughter, not sure what to say, when to say it, how to say it, this is a place to find out from experts who have research, data and personal experience with PCOS patients to back up what they are sharing with you.


Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) keeps rolling them out. I know I’m patting us on the back. Sorry. Just loving the response from the doctors, all the way down, over and over again, to our communities' needs. Free support, information, education and even dinner. And yes, open to the public.


Come take part in the conversation with Dr. Joshua Hurwitz, Melissa Kelleher, LCSW, Diana D’Amelio, RPA-C, and Carolyn Gundell, MS, Nutritionist. RMACT’s PCOS team is here for you. Your daughter is not in this alone.


And neither are you. ~ Lisa Rosenthal

 

Details below:

PCOS Support Event - Parents Forum

Wed, November 12, 6:00pm – 7:30pm


Where

Reproductive Medicine Associates of CT - Norwalk, 10 Glover Ave, Norwalk, CT 06850, United States

map

Description

My Daughter has PCOS: A discussion to help parents understand PCOS and how best to manage it while supporting their daughter. For parents or support persons of young adolescents/women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. Panel will include Dr. Hurwitz, Melissa Kelleher, LCSW, Diana D'Amelio, RPA-C, and Carolyn Gundell, MS Nutritionist. Please RSVP to Chutchinson@rmact.com. Dinner is included.

 

 

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Giving Sugar the Cold Shoulder: Fertility Problems or PCOS or Not

  
  
  

Sugar and Health

Healthy Foods for PCOSThere's been a lot of talk about sugar and health this week at Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT), as we talk about weight, and healthful lifestyle choices, and all the discussion topics related to PCOS: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

Recognizing PCOS Symptoms 

PCOS is characterized by a variety of symptoms that can make it very difficult to become pregnant. Symptoms include, but are not limited to and do not always include: hirstuism (hair growth on face and other places); ability to gain weight easily and not lose it easily; irregular or non-existent menstrual cycles; insulin resistance; and/or small non-malignant cysts in your ovaries.

What Is PCOS? 

This blog is not here to explain what PCOS is and what it isn't. Click here and you will get all the information you need about the clinical assessment of PCOS, how to treat it and more.

 

This blog is about chocolate cake. And fried foods. And white flour. If you've ever had a weight issue, you will probably understand.

 

By weight issue, I mean if you ever wanted to lose a pound or two, or thirty pounds, or if you ever needed to gain ten pounds. By weight issue, I also mean that you may have had problems sticking to a diet or eating in a way that you decided you would--instead finding that you have gone off the diet in ways that you had decided that you wouldn't. Weight issue might also mean that you have found that you have gained or lost weight without meaning to and without having a good idea of how it happened. 

 

Pretty much covers all of us, no? If you are an exception, wow. Write and tell us, cause I want to know how you do it!

 

Finally, though, to the point of this blog. It appears that I owe a chocolate cake my apology.

 

LOL. I know. Sounds ridiculous, doesn't it?

PCOS and Weight

In all my conversations this week about PCOS and weight and all, it turns out it's not so ridiculous.

 

So here goes, my formal apology:

 

I apologize to you, gorgeous-looking cake, with your alluring sweetness and tempting flavor. Turning my back on you was not meant to be disrespectful to you; it was from an intention to be respectful to myself. While you are not evil, nor do you mean to do damage, you are an unhealthy choice for me. Perhaps some people can eat you without damaging side effects; I am not one of those people. I would feel the effects of you for days, in terms of craving and I do not want that for myself. 

 

So my apology for my cold shoulder. I did deliberately turn my back to you so as not to be tempted to eat you. I'm happy there were people who could eat and enjoy you. Perhaps it lessened the impact of my snub.

 

While I'm at it, I may as well apologize to all the fried foods that I won't be eating and white flour products that I will be avoiding. Sorry!

 

Those of you reading my blog today, read this with a smile. I'm not really crazy, just a little bit.

 

 

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PCOS Doesn't End in September - Comments from RMACT's PCOS Team

  
  
  

PCOS Awareness Year-Round

September is PCOS Awareness Month. Ah, but if PCOS would disappear for the other eleven months. What would it be like to only have to deal with this disorder for one month a year? 


We will never know. PCOS is a lifelong condition. The news that can make you smile about it is that there is much you can take into your own hands. While not every symptom and aspect of this disorder is treatable through diet and exercise, many absolutely are. This is a powerful statement. You can treat this disorder with many simple tools that are at your disposal every day.


It's about choice. While you did not choose PCOS, it is a disorder in which your choices make a very big difference. 


CT Fertility Counselor Melissa Kelleher

Melissa Kelleher, LCSW, from RMACT's team on PCOS, shares her thoughts about responding rather than reacting to the news that you have or may have PCOS. Below that, Eloise Downs, RN, tells us of a few favorite and reliable websites to investigate for help and support. 


Read on to hear what a few of our RMACT PCOS members have to say about it. ~Lisa Rosenthal


Coping Techniques for PCOS Diagnosis

When you are first diagnosed with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome), it can be overwhelming.  Fortunately, there are ways that you can deal with it and feel that you are able to take some control back.  PCOS will not go away completely but by developing some coping techniques it will become more manageable and you will get to a point where it is not a constant source of stress.  Here are a few tips:

 

  • Be an ACTIVE participant in your treatment
  • Remember that it takes time for medical treatments to work
  • Utilize coping strategies that will reduce your feelings of stress.  Explore different ways until you find one (or a few) that work best.  Here are a few examples:
    • write in a journal
    • start a blog
    • speak to family or friends
    • learn and utilize relaxation techniques
    • visit message boards/websites to connect with others with PCOS
    • join a peer support group
    • do things that will help improve your self-esteem
      • eat healthy foods
      • set up an exercise plan
      • do something special for yourself that makes you feel good
      • if necessary, seek individual counseling to help deal with feelings related to PCOS
      • and then, one day…
        • Be an inspiration to others with PCOS! 
~Melissa Kelleher, LCSW

 

PCOS Support Resources

 

Eloise Downs, our wonderful Registered Nurse on the PCOS team, has this to add for PCOS support:

 

The following are a few of my favorite resources for patients, parents or anyone suspecting that they may have PCOS:

 

www.Pcosnutrition.com – great PCOS nutrition website.

 

www.managingpcos.org.au -  an Australian website.  The group behind this website developed and documented evidence-based guidelines for PCOS;  we heard the leading physician speak at the NIH conference.

 

www.youngwomenshealth.org/pcosinfo.html -  good resource for teens with PCOS to see a well rounded view of this very common endocrine disorder.

 

PCOS is best treated as early as possible, when symptoms first appear. Please let us know if we can help you in any way, including answering questions right here on PathtoFertility.

 

Lisa Rosenthal's Google+

 

 

Fertility Specialist Explains PCOS And Shares Her Own Story

  
  
  

Nurse Practitioner Monica Moore

Fertility Specialist Explains PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome)

Nurse Practitioner Monica Moore, MSN, RN, Shares Her Own Story


I promised you another blog explaining PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) and who better than Nurse Practitioner Monica Moore, MSN, RN, to explain. As always, Monica goes a step further than a comprehensive description of the syndrome; she shares her own experience with us. And as always, she gives hope. Thanks, Monica, for a great blog!


PCOS, polycystic ovarian syndrome, is a common, but confusing endocrine condition. It is characterized by menstrual cycle irregularity, absent (anovulation) or infrequent ovulation, and an excess of androgens (male hormones) that cause acne, unwanted facial hair growth and hair thinning. It also predisposes the people who have it to diabetes, high cholesterol, and other risks. Although PCOS can’t be “cured”, it can be managed by making some simple lifestyle changes.

 

PCOS and Insulin Resistance 

As stated above, PCOS is very common: about 5-10% of women who are reproductive age have it. What is now known is that PCOS is a condition caused by insulin resistance. Insulin resistance can lead to abnormally high levels of circulating blood glucose (sugar) which can lead to serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes, elevated cholesterol and high blood pressure.

 


I, like many other patients with PCOS, saw multiple practitioners to treat my symptoms. I saw a dermatologist for my skin, a GYN due to missed periods and had laser hair removal. When I wanted to attempt pregnancy, I saw a reproductive endocrinologist who did a vaginal ultrasound and showed me the multiple tiny cysts on my ovaries which are characteristic of PCOS. After I was given this diagnosis, I was initially disheartened. I didn’t want to be told that I would have to deal with this disease for the rest of my life. I then realized that it was actually a relief to have a reason for the symptoms that I was experiencing, and I set about reading as much as I could about PCOS.

 


Fast-forward 10 years, when I decided to become a fertility nurse. I now know, and try to explain to patients who have PCOS, that I would much rather have this diagnosis than many other infertility diagnoses. One reason is that it is well-known that anovulation is one of the easiest infertility factors to treat. Many patients with PCOS get pregnant with minimal fertility treatments. In addition, most of the infertility factors, such as blocked fallopian tubes, fibroids or endometriosis, cannot be improved by lifestyle changes. I have found that this can cause a sense of helplessness and frustration in the patients given these diagnoses. The negative consequences of PCOS, on the other hand, can be somewhat lessened by employing certain, reasonable strategies, enabling patients to be proactive in their own care.

 

PCOS and Weight: Opportunities and Challenges

PCOS and Weight


Approximately 70% of people with PCOS are overweight and the condition itself makes losing weight even harder than it already is. One reason is that the hormones which regulate hunger and fullness are imbalanced. Someone with PCOS might still feel hungry after a regular-sized meal, for example. Also, people with PCOS crave carbohydrates, usually simple carbs such as bread and sweets, which signal the pancreas to release high levels of insulin and the cycle perpetuates itself.

 


On a positive note, studies show that even a modest weight loss can effectively lower the risks of the serious medical conditions and can alleviate some of the PCOS-related symptoms listed earlier. A weight loss of just 5% will go a long way towards restoring ovulation and menstrual cycle regularity. For those who are not attempting pregnancy, going on certain birth control pills can help to control excess androgens, which may help acne resolve and prevent new body hair from growing. They will not, though, get rid of existing body hair, but many people have success using lasers or electrolysis for this. Some patients require medication to increase their body’s sensitivity to insulin. One medication is called metformin (or glucophage) and is only prescribed if you have insulin or sugar problems--it is not a wonder drug that makes PCOS go away. There is now a natural insulin-sensitizing agent available, called Pregnitude®, that seems promising. Recent studies suggest that it can improve insulin resistance just as well as metformin, but without the side effects.

 

Improve Your Chances of Conception

Whether you need medication or not, here are some simple things that you can do to improve the quality of your health and improve the chances of conceiving:


1) Consult a Nutritionist. Meet with a nutritionist who specializes in PCOS or insulin-resistance, or attend a nutrition seminar. People with PCOS need to eat differently than others, since their hunger signals don’t work properly. There are easy ways to improve your diet, such as eating small meals frequently, and assuring that each meal contains a healthy mix of carbohydrates, proteins, and “good” fat component. A nutritionist will help you plan your meals and read labels to find healthy food choices.


2) Exercise. Don’t be daunted by the need to exercise for long periods of time every day. Even short, frequent sessions of exercise can be helpful. Try to incorporate activity in your daily life, such as walking to a colleague’s desk instead of sending an e-mail or walking outside with a pet instead of just letting it outside into your backyard. Some researchers suggest that the amount of inactivity daily is just as important as the amount of activity, so trying to move around often can help. Find an activity that you like and is fun, such as dance classes or a dance video that you can do at home. Try to make “appointments” to exercise, such as a class you pay for, or plan on meeting a friend at the gym.


3) Manage Stress. There are many ways to manage stress. Your body responds to stress by releasing a cascade of hormones. One of these is cortisol, which can lead to abdominal fat. The other is epinephrine, which triggers the liver to release glucose into the bloodstream to be used for emergencies. When there is no emergency, this glucose remains and prompts the pancreas to release insulin. Join a support group. Try to incorporate some form of a mind-body approach in your every day life. For some people, that can be yoga, acupuncture, acupressure, journaling, Reiki or just meditating on your own. Even adopting a sense of mindfulness can help, such as really noticing your food or reflecting on how beautiful a sunny day feels or a fall day smells.

Benefits of Sleep


4) Get more sleep! Lack of sleep can increase the signals for hunger and increase your appetite. The National Center for Health Statistics found that obesity was much more common in people who got less than 6 hours of sleep per night. There are some resources available, such as your local hospital’s Sleep Clinic, which can assist you in obtaining good-quality sleep.


5) Pursue comprehensive care. Comprehensive care for PCOS is paramount. This condition is multi-faceted and may require the participation of multiple health-care providers, such as your OB/GYN, dermatologist, reproductive endocrinologist and internist, but this can also lead to fragmented care in which one physician is not aware of what the other is doing. At RMACT, we have a PCOS clinic for this reason. Our team of clinicians, nurses and a nutritionist work closely with other providers to provide continuity of care and narrow any ‘gaps’.

 

Most importantly, realize that the diagnosis of PCOS is surmountable. Small, manageable steps can make a big difference!

 

 

 

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Fertility Doctor, Dr. Joshua Hurwitz, Explains PCOS and Treatment

  
  
  

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

Fertility Doctor Dr. Joshua Hurwitz About PCOSBy Joshua M. Hurwitz, MD

Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut

 

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is a medical condition that causes infertility by preventing women from ovulating. It is a common condition, affecting 5- 10% of women of reproductive age.  In terms of conceiving a baby, the hormonal imbalances created by PCOS prevent the ovary from ovulating and releasing an egg to meet with the sperm.

 

The goal of fertility therapy for patients with PCOS is to restore hormonal balance and induce ovulation.  This is achieved by treatment with stimulatory medicines that can either be oral pills (such as clomiphene citrate or letrozole), or injectable medicines, termed gonadotropins.  Some patients with PCOS need more advanced fertility treatments, such as IVF, if their ovaries are either resistant to initial treatment or respond too well to treatment.

 

Many women with PCOS have ovaries that are producing excess hormones, specifically the male hormone testosterone.  In addition, they can have a decreased sensitivity to insulin for which their bodies compensate by over-producing insulin. The overactive ovaries and high levels of insulin may contribute to the development of hirsuitism (excessive body hair) and worsen the already present ovulation disorder.  There is evidence that excess insulin plays a role in the development of PCOS, it is therefore hypothesized that reducing the circulating levels of insulin may help restore normal reproductive function. This may be accomplished by weight loss, improved nutrition, and exercise. These lifestyle changes should be the first line of therapy for any woman with PCOS.

 

Additionally, there is some evidence that insulin sensitizing agents can aid in both the medical and fertility therapy of PCOS.  The best studied insulin sensitizing agent available in the United States for women with PCOS is metformin (Glucophage®). Metformin reduces circulating insulin and androgen levels and may restore normal ovulation in select women with PCOS.  The most current scientific evidence shows that metformin alone does not usually restore ovulation, but in some women it may possibly improve the ovarian response to fertility medications. Most patients with PCOS do not need metformin, and the decision to prescribe metformin is made by your physician on a case-by-case basis to ensure personalized treatment plans. 

 

In addition to these infertility and reproductive problems, there are also health issues for patients with PCOS that include: irregular menstrual periods, obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and a pre-disposition towards Type 2 diabetes.  Some of these symptoms, if left untreated, can lead to heart disease later in life.

Diagnosing PCOS: Symptoms and Tests

Diagnosing Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome  (PCOS)We can diagnosis women with PCOS by reviewing your symptoms: infertility, irregular menstrual periods (or skipping them entirely), severe and chronic acne and excessive body hair growth.  The symptom that brings most women to see a specialist is irregular menstrual periods.   If you are having fewer than 4-6 menstrual periods per year, you should have the lining of your uterus evaluated for overgrowth, a condition known as endometrial hyperplasia. You should also have a fasting sugar test to make sure you do not have a pre-diabetic condition called Insulin-Resistance that is common in patients with PCOS.  Additionally, cholesterol levels and blood pressure should be checked regularly.  It is also important to maintain a routine of diet and exercise.  Many studies have shown an improvement in every aspect of PCOS with a sustained loss of 5-10% of your body weight, regardless of your starting weight.

 

Treatment of PCOS: Four Main Goals

 

In terms of treatment, there are four main goals. 

 

  1. If you are trying to have a baby, you should see a fertility specialist, called a Reproductive Endocrinologist & Infertility specialist, as soon as possible. 
  2. Maintain the health of your body to prevent heart disease and diabetes. 
  3. The severe acne and excessive hair growth of PCOS can be treated both medically and cosmetically. 
  4. If you are not interested in becoming pregnant, your OBGYN can help regulate your menstrual periods in order to protect the lining of your uterus from overgrowth.  This is usually accomplished through the use of birth control pills for cycle regulation.

 

Helping patients with PCOS achieve their family-building goals is our primary goal here at RMACT, but we never lose sight of the medical issues associated with this common condition.

 

Please visit the following websites for more information:

 

http://www.pcosupport.org/

http://www.asrm.org/Patients/topics/pcos.html

http://www.asrm.org/membersonly/practice/Insulin_sensitizing_agents.pdf

http://www.asrm.org/membersonly/practice/Androgen_Excess.pdf

http://www.atime.org/scripts/main.cgi?action=show_facts

www.healthfinder.gov

 

 

PCOS Women to Women-Free and Open to Public-Tomorrow Night

  
  
  

PCOS Support Event "Women to Women"

In the nearly five years that I have been writing and publishing the PathtoFertility blog, I have rarely (once or twice) ever repeated a blog in it's original form. Today is an exception. Tomorrow night's event on PCOS is so important and so potentially life changing that I am doing it. I'm reposting. If you have PCOS or suspect that you might, RSVP and join this group.

 

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common causes of infertility. It is also one of the most common, if not the most common, endocrine disorders for women. Given that it is so common and that some of the symptoms can be so very challenging to manage, why manage it alone? PCOS can cause symptoms that are embarassing, discouraging and health threatening. There are scientific, data and research driven ways for you to combat these symptoms successfully.


Our PCOS Women to Women Night is a great place to start. Find out what you can do to be proactive with your health and emotional well being. This evening is free and open to the public, but we do need you to RSVP. 


Do this for yourself. You deserve the help and support. ~ Lisa Rosenthal

PCOS Women to Women Night

An Interactive Group for Women with PCOS

 

PCOS Support RibbonYou are invited to chat, make new friends, get support, & Learn more about PCOS.  There will be a brief presentation followed by a light dinner and social time to connect with others with PCOS.

 

Topic: Stress and PCOS

  • How stress can affect PCOS
  • Share ways that you might self nurture and exhibit self compassion
  • Learn how practicing a mindful lifestyle can improve your quality of life

 

Where:

RMA CT Norwalk

10 Glover Avenue

Norwalk, CT 06850

 

When:

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

6:00pm-7:30pm

 

This group is free and open to the public.  A light dinner will be served.

 

RMACT presenters are:

Carolyn Gundell, MS, Nutritionist and Melissa Kelleher, LCSW, Mind Body Specialist


RSVP required: Please contact Carlene at 203-750-7491 or cstahlnecker@rmact.com


 

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PCOS Women to Women-Free Support and Help You Deserve-Open to Public

  
  
  

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) Support Group

integrated fertility wellness at RMACTPolycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common causes of infertility. It is also one of the most common, if not the most common, endocrine disorders for women. Given that it is so common and that some of the symptoms can be so very challenging to manage, why manage it alone? PCOS can cause symptoms that are embarassing, discouraging and health threatening. There are scientific, data and research driven ways for you to combat these symptoms successfully.


Our PCOS Women to Women Night is a great place to start. Find out what you can do to be proactive with your health and emotional well being. This evening is free and open to the public, but we do need you to RSVP. 


Do this for yourself. You deserve the help and support. ~ Lisa Rosenthal

PCOS Women to Women Night

An Interactive Group for Women with PCOS

 

PCOS Support RibbonYou are invited to chat, make new friends, get support, & Learn more about PCOS.  There will be a brief presentation followed by a light dinner and social time to connect with others with PCOS.

 

Topic: Stress and PCOS

  • How stress can affect PCOS
  • Share ways that you might self nurture and exhibit self compassion
  • Learn how practicing a mindful lifestyle can improve your quality of life

 

Where:

RMA CT Norwalk

10 Glover Avenue

Norwalk, CT 06850

 

When:

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

6:00pm-7:30pm

 

This group is free and open to the public.  A light dinner will be served.

 

RMACT presenters are:

Carolyn Gundell, MS, Nutritionist and Melissa Kelleher, LCSW, Mind Body Specialist


RSVP required: Please contact Carlene at 203-750-7491 or cstahlnecker@rmact.com


 

Follow Lisa on Google+

 

 

PCOS Awareness Month - September

  
  
  

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome  - PCOS Awareness Month

Hope for PCOS Awareness MonthThis is the month that we talk about PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome).


I wouldn't say we are exactly celebrating it. Talking about it, yes. Bringing awareness to the general public, yes. Educating about it, yes.


Celebrating it, no.

 

PCOS is a very common endocrine disorder in women that exhibits with many different symptoms and can cause many different medical problems.


There is no one typical PCOS "face", but there are certainly things that PCOS women have in common. 


Here's what we have on our Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) website about the disagnosis of PCOS. This month we will be sharing information about how to manage symptoms and find a way to truly thrive with this condition. 


It's possible. It's challenging. It's also very, very possible. There are many things that are in your control to do and try with PCOS. Read more about it here as the month goes on. 


Meanwhile, here's what we share on our RMACT website:


Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is a medical condition that causes infertility by preventing women from ovulating. It is a common condition, affecting 5-10% of women of reproductive age. In terms of conceiving a baby, the hormonal imbalances created by PCOS prevent the ovary from ovulating and releasing an egg to meet with the sperm.

Symptoms of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

Many women with PCOS have ovaries that are producing excess hormones, specifically the hormone testosterone. In addition they can have a decreased sensitivity to insulin for which their bodies compensate by over-producing insulin. The overactive ovaries and high levels of insulin may contribute to the development of hirsuitism (excessive body hair) and worsen the already present ovulation disorder. There is evidence that excess insulin plays a role in the development of PCOS, it is therefore hypothesized that reducing the circulating levels of insulin may help restore normal reproductive function. This may be accomplished by weight loss, improved nutrition, and exercise. These lifestyle changes should be the first line of therapy for any woman with PCOS.


Additionally, there is some evidence that insulin sensitizing agents can aid in both the medical and fertility therapy of PCOS. The best studied insulin sensitizing agent available in the United States for women with PCOS is metformin (Glucophage®). Metformin reduces circulating insulin and androgen levels and may restore normal ovulation in select women with PCOS. The most current scientific evidence shows that metformin alone does not usually restore ovulation, but in some women it may improve the ovarian response to fertility medications. Most patients with PCOS do not need metformin, and the decision to prescribe metformin is made by your physician on a case-by-case basis to ensure personalized treatment plans.


In addition to these infertility and reproductive problems, there are also health issues for patients with PCOS that include: irregular menstrual periods, obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and a pre-disposition towards Type 2 diabetes. Some of these symptoms, if left untreated, can lead to heart disease later in life.


Diagnosing Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome


We can diagnosis women with PCOS by reviewing your symptoms: infertility, irregular menstrual periods (or skipping them entirely), severe and chronic acne and excessive body hair growth. The symptom that brings most women to see a specialist is irregular menstrual periods. If you are having fewer than 4-6 menstrual periods per year, you should have the lining of your uterus evaluated for overgrowth, a condition known as endometrial hyperplasia. You should also have a fasting sugar test to make sure you do not have a pre-diabetic condition called Insulin-Resistance that is common in patients with PCOS. Additionally, cholesterol levels and blood pressure should be checked regularly. It is also important to maintain a routine of diet and exercise. Many studies have shown an improvement in every aspect of PCOS with a sustained loss of 5-10% of your body weight, regardless of your starting weight. Click to see more about PCOS.


We'll share additional information about PCOS in September. 


Do you have PCOS questions? Please post here. They will remain private, but we will answer them on the blog. We welcome your comments as well. 

 

Lisa Rosenthal's Google+

 

 

CT Fertility Specialist, Dr. Joshua Hurwitz - PCOS Program Leader

  
  
  

Meet CT Fertility Specialist Dr. Joshua Hurwitz

Continuing on the path of meeting the excellent, award winning board certified reproductive endocrinologists of Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT), here is our CT fertility specialist Dr. Joshua Hurwitz. Dr. Hurwitz is well known with his patients as a doctor that is firmly on their side, supporting them whatever their decisions about fertility treatment. Very quietly, he has been tireless in fertility preservation, (providing services for women about to go through fertility-threatening cancer treatment), as well as heading RMACT's PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) Program. Learn more about Dr. Hurwitz below. Thanks for reading! ~Lisa Rosenthal

Board Certified Reproductive Endocrinologist

ct fertility specialist dr. joshua hurwitzDr. Joshua Hurwitz is a board certified reproductive endocrinologist, (infertility specialist) at Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) who joined the practice in 2006 with a passion for patient care and teaching.  In addition, he is Division Director of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (REI) services in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences of Danbury Hospital. 


He is board certified in both Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. Board-Certified Reproductive Endocrinologist: Infertility Specialist – Connecticut & New York As Division Director of REI, Dr. Hurwitz is responsible for developing and implementing the division’s academic program, teaching residents, and giving lectures, as well as caring for infertility patients.  Dr. Hurwitz has been teaching residents at Danbury Hospital in the operating rooms, clinic and RMACT’s private office for over three years, making his transition to director a natural progression. 


He will continue teaching and implementing the most advanced infertility therapies available, including endocrinological, surgical, genetic and in-vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques. He received his undergraduate degree in Biology & Society from Cornell University, and his medical degree from the Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia.


Dr. Hurwitz completed his residency in Obstetrics & Gynecology at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, also in Philadelphia. During residency training, Dr. Hurwitz was named Best Laparoscopic Surgeon, and has received many teaching awards. After residency, he completed a three year fellowhip in reproductive endocrinology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York.  During his fellowship, Dr. Hurwitz successfully launched several research programs related to reproductive aging and diminished ovarian reserve and has presented his research findings at many leading national and international fertility conferences. His research interests also include premature ovarian failure, oocyte cryopreservation, reproductive surgeries, embryo donation, and bioethics. He has published numerous abstracts, articles and book chapters on reproductive aging, reproductive hormones, IVF, ultrasound, and bioethics. Dr. Hurwitz is a member of the Society of Reproductive Endocrinologists, Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. He is also currently Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Women’s Health at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Contact us to book an appointment with infertility specialist Dr. Hurwitz.


See interview clips of Dr. Hurwitz from “A Simple Dream,” a four-part series that explores science, surrogacy and a couple’s quest for a child from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Dr. Joshua Hurwitz | Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

 

PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) Program Leader

 

Dr. Hurwitz heads our PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) program, with his usual passion and dedication. 


“Too many of our patients come to us in their late 20’s or 30’s when they are having trouble getting pregnant,” says Dr. Joshua M. Hurwitz, who is leading the RMACT Pediatric Adolescent Program. “These patients have been suffering with PCOS symptoms for years, sometimes since puberty.  PCOS often goes undiagnosed, which leaves the patient vulnerable to frustration and long-term health issues.  We want to reach these patients earlier and help them manage their PCOS; we want to reach them in their teens.”

 

RMACT’s Adolescent PCOS Program provides a three-pronged approach for PCOS patients: nutrition, hormone management, and education. Early detection enables patients to manage their condition and limit the long-term affects of PCOS, including diabetes, heart disease, elevated cholesterol, endometrial cancer, hypertension, thyroid issues, sleep apnea, and later on, infertility. Each patient is cared for by a complete PCOS team: Dr. Joshua M. Hurwitz; Carolyn Gundell, M.S.; Monica Moore, nurse practitioner; Diana D’Amelio, RPA-C; Eloise Downs, registered nurse.

 

Contact us to book an appointment with infertility specialist Dr. Hurwitz.

 

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