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Path To Fertility Blogger Lisa Rosenthal  

Lisa Rosenthal has over twenty-five years of experience in the fertility field, including her current roles as Coordinator of Professional and Patient Communications for RMACT and teacher and founder of Fertile Yoga, a class designed to support, comfort and enhance men and women's sense of self. Her experience also includes working with RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association and The American Fertility Association, where she was Educational Coordinator, Conference Director and Assistant Executive Director

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PCOS Doesn't End in September - Comments from RMACT's PCOS Team

  
  
  

PCOS Awareness Year-Round

September is PCOS Awareness Month. Ah, but if PCOS would disappear for the other eleven months. What would it be like to only have to deal with this disorder for one month a year? 


We will never know. PCOS is a lifelong condition. The news that can make you smile about it is that there is much you can take into your own hands. While not every symptom and aspect of this disorder is treatable through diet and exercise, many absolutely are. This is a powerful statement. You can treat this disorder with many simple tools that are at your disposal every day.


It's about choice. While you did not choose PCOS, it is a disorder in which your choices make a very big difference. 


CT Fertility Counselor Melissa Kelleher

Melissa Kelleher, LCSW, from RMACT's team on PCOS, shares her thoughts about responding rather than reacting to the news that you have or may have PCOS. Below that, Eloise Downs, RN, tells us of a few favorite and reliable websites to investigate for help and support. 


Read on to hear what a few of our RMACT PCOS members have to say about it. ~Lisa Rosenthal


Coping Techniques for PCOS Diagnosis

When you are first diagnosed with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome), it can be overwhelming.  Fortunately, there are ways that you can deal with it and feel that you are able to take some control back.  PCOS will not go away completely but by developing some coping techniques it will become more manageable and you will get to a point where it is not a constant source of stress.  Here are a few tips:

 

  • Be an ACTIVE participant in your treatment
  • Remember that it takes time for medical treatments to work
  • Utilize coping strategies that will reduce your feelings of stress.  Explore different ways until you find one (or a few) that work best.  Here are a few examples:
    • write in a journal
    • start a blog
    • speak to family or friends
    • learn and utilize relaxation techniques
    • visit message boards/websites to connect with others with PCOS
    • join a peer support group
    • do things that will help improve your self-esteem
      • eat healthy foods
      • set up an exercise plan
      • do something special for yourself that makes you feel good
      • if necessary, seek individual counseling to help deal with feelings related to PCOS
      • and then, one day…
        • Be an inspiration to others with PCOS! 
~Melissa Kelleher, LCSW

 

PCOS Support Resources

 

Eloise Downs, our wonderful Registered Nurse on the PCOS team, has this to add for PCOS support:

 

The following are a few of my favorite resources for patients, parents or anyone suspecting that they may have PCOS:

 

www.Pcosnutrition.com – great PCOS nutrition website.

 

www.managingpcos.org.au -  an Australian website.  The group behind this website developed and documented evidence-based guidelines for PCOS;  we heard the leading physician speak at the NIH conference.

 

www.youngwomenshealth.org/pcosinfo.html -  good resource for teens with PCOS to see a well rounded view of this very common endocrine disorder.

 

PCOS is best treated as early as possible, when symptoms first appear. Please let us know if we can help you in any way, including answering questions right here on PathtoFertility.

 

Lisa Rosenthal's Google+

 

 

Fertility Doctor, Dr. Joshua Hurwitz, Explains PCOS and Treatment

  
  
  

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

Fertility Doctor Dr. Joshua Hurwitz About PCOSBy Joshua M. Hurwitz, MD

Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut

 

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is a medical condition that causes infertility by preventing women from ovulating. It is a common condition, affecting 5- 10% of women of reproductive age.  In terms of conceiving a baby, the hormonal imbalances created by PCOS prevent the ovary from ovulating and releasing an egg to meet with the sperm.

 

The goal of fertility therapy for patients with PCOS is to restore hormonal balance and induce ovulation.  This is achieved by treatment with stimulatory medicines that can either be oral pills (such as clomiphene citrate or letrozole), or injectable medicines, termed gonadotropins.  Some patients with PCOS need more advanced fertility treatments, such as IVF, if their ovaries are either resistant to initial treatment or respond too well to treatment.

 

Many women with PCOS have ovaries that are producing excess hormones, specifically the male hormone testosterone.  In addition, they can have a decreased sensitivity to insulin for which their bodies compensate by over-producing insulin. The overactive ovaries and high levels of insulin may contribute to the development of hirsuitism (excessive body hair) and worsen the already present ovulation disorder.  There is evidence that excess insulin plays a role in the development of PCOS, it is therefore hypothesized that reducing the circulating levels of insulin may help restore normal reproductive function. This may be accomplished by weight loss, improved nutrition, and exercise. These lifestyle changes should be the first line of therapy for any woman with PCOS.

 

Additionally, there is some evidence that insulin sensitizing agents can aid in both the medical and fertility therapy of PCOS.  The best studied insulin sensitizing agent available in the United States for women with PCOS is metformin (Glucophage®). Metformin reduces circulating insulin and androgen levels and may restore normal ovulation in select women with PCOS.  The most current scientific evidence shows that metformin alone does not usually restore ovulation, but in some women it may possibly improve the ovarian response to fertility medications. Most patients with PCOS do not need metformin, and the decision to prescribe metformin is made by your physician on a case-by-case basis to ensure personalized treatment plans. 

 

In addition to these infertility and reproductive problems, there are also health issues for patients with PCOS that include: irregular menstrual periods, obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and a pre-disposition towards Type 2 diabetes.  Some of these symptoms, if left untreated, can lead to heart disease later in life.

Diagnosing PCOS: Symptoms and Tests

Diagnosing Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome  (PCOS)We can diagnosis women with PCOS by reviewing your symptoms: infertility, irregular menstrual periods (or skipping them entirely), severe and chronic acne and excessive body hair growth.  The symptom that brings most women to see a specialist is irregular menstrual periods.   If you are having fewer than 4-6 menstrual periods per year, you should have the lining of your uterus evaluated for overgrowth, a condition known as endometrial hyperplasia. You should also have a fasting sugar test to make sure you do not have a pre-diabetic condition called Insulin-Resistance that is common in patients with PCOS.  Additionally, cholesterol levels and blood pressure should be checked regularly.  It is also important to maintain a routine of diet and exercise.  Many studies have shown an improvement in every aspect of PCOS with a sustained loss of 5-10% of your body weight, regardless of your starting weight.

 

Treatment of PCOS: Four Main Goals

 

In terms of treatment, there are four main goals. 

 

  1. If you are trying to have a baby, you should see a fertility specialist, called a Reproductive Endocrinologist & Infertility specialist, as soon as possible. 
  2. Maintain the health of your body to prevent heart disease and diabetes. 
  3. The severe acne and excessive hair growth of PCOS can be treated both medically and cosmetically. 
  4. If you are not interested in becoming pregnant, your OBGYN can help regulate your menstrual periods in order to protect the lining of your uterus from overgrowth.  This is usually accomplished through the use of birth control pills for cycle regulation.

 

Helping patients with PCOS achieve their family-building goals is our primary goal here at RMACT, but we never lose sight of the medical issues associated with this common condition.

 

Please visit the following websites for more information:

 

http://www.pcosupport.org/

http://www.asrm.org/Patients/topics/pcos.html

http://www.asrm.org/membersonly/practice/Insulin_sensitizing_agents.pdf

http://www.asrm.org/membersonly/practice/Androgen_Excess.pdf

http://www.atime.org/scripts/main.cgi?action=show_facts

www.healthfinder.gov

 

 

PCOS Women to Women-Free and Open to Public-Tomorrow Night

  
  
  

PCOS Support Event "Women to Women"

In the nearly five years that I have been writing and publishing the PathtoFertility blog, I have rarely (once or twice) ever repeated a blog in it's original form. Today is an exception. Tomorrow night's event on PCOS is so important and so potentially life changing that I am doing it. I'm reposting. If you have PCOS or suspect that you might, RSVP and join this group.

 

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common causes of infertility. It is also one of the most common, if not the most common, endocrine disorders for women. Given that it is so common and that some of the symptoms can be so very challenging to manage, why manage it alone? PCOS can cause symptoms that are embarassing, discouraging and health threatening. There are scientific, data and research driven ways for you to combat these symptoms successfully.


Our PCOS Women to Women Night is a great place to start. Find out what you can do to be proactive with your health and emotional well being. This evening is free and open to the public, but we do need you to RSVP. 


Do this for yourself. You deserve the help and support. ~ Lisa Rosenthal

PCOS Women to Women Night

An Interactive Group for Women with PCOS

 

PCOS Support RibbonYou are invited to chat, make new friends, get support, & Learn more about PCOS.  There will be a brief presentation followed by a light dinner and social time to connect with others with PCOS.

 

Topic: Stress and PCOS

  • How stress can affect PCOS
  • Share ways that you might self nurture and exhibit self compassion
  • Learn how practicing a mindful lifestyle can improve your quality of life

 

Where:

RMA CT Norwalk

10 Glover Avenue

Norwalk, CT 06850

 

When:

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

6:00pm-7:30pm

 

This group is free and open to the public.  A light dinner will be served.

 

RMACT presenters are:

Carolyn Gundell, MS, Nutritionist and Melissa Kelleher, LCSW, Mind Body Specialist


RSVP required: Please contact Carlene at 203-750-7491 or cstahlnecker@rmact.com


 

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PCOS Women to Women-Free Support and Help You Deserve-Open to Public

  
  
  

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) Support Group

integrated fertility wellness at RMACTPolycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common causes of infertility. It is also one of the most common, if not the most common, endocrine disorders for women. Given that it is so common and that some of the symptoms can be so very challenging to manage, why manage it alone? PCOS can cause symptoms that are embarassing, discouraging and health threatening. There are scientific, data and research driven ways for you to combat these symptoms successfully.


Our PCOS Women to Women Night is a great place to start. Find out what you can do to be proactive with your health and emotional well being. This evening is free and open to the public, but we do need you to RSVP. 


Do this for yourself. You deserve the help and support. ~ Lisa Rosenthal

PCOS Women to Women Night

An Interactive Group for Women with PCOS

 

PCOS Support RibbonYou are invited to chat, make new friends, get support, & Learn more about PCOS.  There will be a brief presentation followed by a light dinner and social time to connect with others with PCOS.

 

Topic: Stress and PCOS

  • How stress can affect PCOS
  • Share ways that you might self nurture and exhibit self compassion
  • Learn how practicing a mindful lifestyle can improve your quality of life

 

Where:

RMA CT Norwalk

10 Glover Avenue

Norwalk, CT 06850

 

When:

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

6:00pm-7:30pm

 

This group is free and open to the public.  A light dinner will be served.

 

RMACT presenters are:

Carolyn Gundell, MS, Nutritionist and Melissa Kelleher, LCSW, Mind Body Specialist


RSVP required: Please contact Carlene at 203-750-7491 or cstahlnecker@rmact.com


 

Follow Lisa on Google+

 

 

PCOS Awareness Month - September

  
  
  

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome  - PCOS Awareness Month

Hope for PCOS Awareness MonthThis is the month that we talk about PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome).


I wouldn't say we are exactly celebrating it. Talking about it, yes. Bringing awareness to the general public, yes. Educating about it, yes.


Celebrating it, no.

 

PCOS is a very common endocrine disorder in women that exhibits with many different symptoms and can cause many different medical problems.


There is no one typical PCOS "face", but there are certainly things that PCOS women have in common. 


Here's what we have on our Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) website about the disagnosis of PCOS. This month we will be sharing information about how to manage symptoms and find a way to truly thrive with this condition. 


It's possible. It's challenging. It's also very, very possible. There are many things that are in your control to do and try with PCOS. Read more about it here as the month goes on. 


Meanwhile, here's what we share on our RMACT website:


Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is a medical condition that causes infertility by preventing women from ovulating. It is a common condition, affecting 5-10% of women of reproductive age. In terms of conceiving a baby, the hormonal imbalances created by PCOS prevent the ovary from ovulating and releasing an egg to meet with the sperm.

Symptoms of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

Many women with PCOS have ovaries that are producing excess hormones, specifically the hormone testosterone. In addition they can have a decreased sensitivity to insulin for which their bodies compensate by over-producing insulin. The overactive ovaries and high levels of insulin may contribute to the development of hirsuitism (excessive body hair) and worsen the already present ovulation disorder. There is evidence that excess insulin plays a role in the development of PCOS, it is therefore hypothesized that reducing the circulating levels of insulin may help restore normal reproductive function. This may be accomplished by weight loss, improved nutrition, and exercise. These lifestyle changes should be the first line of therapy for any woman with PCOS.


Additionally, there is some evidence that insulin sensitizing agents can aid in both the medical and fertility therapy of PCOS. The best studied insulin sensitizing agent available in the United States for women with PCOS is metformin (Glucophage®). Metformin reduces circulating insulin and androgen levels and may restore normal ovulation in select women with PCOS. The most current scientific evidence shows that metformin alone does not usually restore ovulation, but in some women it may improve the ovarian response to fertility medications. Most patients with PCOS do not need metformin, and the decision to prescribe metformin is made by your physician on a case-by-case basis to ensure personalized treatment plans.


In addition to these infertility and reproductive problems, there are also health issues for patients with PCOS that include: irregular menstrual periods, obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and a pre-disposition towards Type 2 diabetes. Some of these symptoms, if left untreated, can lead to heart disease later in life.


Diagnosing Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome


We can diagnosis women with PCOS by reviewing your symptoms: infertility, irregular menstrual periods (or skipping them entirely), severe and chronic acne and excessive body hair growth. The symptom that brings most women to see a specialist is irregular menstrual periods. If you are having fewer than 4-6 menstrual periods per year, you should have the lining of your uterus evaluated for overgrowth, a condition known as endometrial hyperplasia. You should also have a fasting sugar test to make sure you do not have a pre-diabetic condition called Insulin-Resistance that is common in patients with PCOS. Additionally, cholesterol levels and blood pressure should be checked regularly. It is also important to maintain a routine of diet and exercise. Many studies have shown an improvement in every aspect of PCOS with a sustained loss of 5-10% of your body weight, regardless of your starting weight. Click to see more about PCOS.


We'll share additional information about PCOS in September. 


Do you have PCOS questions? Please post here. They will remain private, but we will answer them on the blog. We welcome your comments as well. 

 

Lisa Rosenthal's Google+

 

 

CT Fertility Specialist, Dr. Joshua Hurwitz - PCOS Program Leader

  
  
  

Meet CT Fertility Specialist Dr. Joshua Hurwitz

Continuing on the path of meeting the excellent, award winning board certified reproductive endocrinologists of Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT), here is our CT fertility specialist Dr. Joshua Hurwitz. Dr. Hurwitz is well known with his patients as a doctor that is firmly on their side, supporting them whatever their decisions about fertility treatment. Very quietly, he has been tireless in fertility preservation, (providing services for women about to go through fertility-threatening cancer treatment), as well as heading RMACT's PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) Program. Learn more about Dr. Hurwitz below. Thanks for reading! ~Lisa Rosenthal

Board Certified Reproductive Endocrinologist

ct fertility specialist dr. joshua hurwitzDr. Joshua Hurwitz is a board certified reproductive endocrinologist, (infertility specialist) at Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) who joined the practice in 2006 with a passion for patient care and teaching.  In addition, he is Division Director of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (REI) services in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences of Danbury Hospital. 


He is board certified in both Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. Board-Certified Reproductive Endocrinologist: Infertility Specialist – Connecticut & New York As Division Director of REI, Dr. Hurwitz is responsible for developing and implementing the division’s academic program, teaching residents, and giving lectures, as well as caring for infertility patients.  Dr. Hurwitz has been teaching residents at Danbury Hospital in the operating rooms, clinic and RMACT’s private office for over three years, making his transition to director a natural progression. 


He will continue teaching and implementing the most advanced infertility therapies available, including endocrinological, surgical, genetic and in-vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques. He received his undergraduate degree in Biology & Society from Cornell University, and his medical degree from the Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia.


Dr. Hurwitz completed his residency in Obstetrics & Gynecology at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, also in Philadelphia. During residency training, Dr. Hurwitz was named Best Laparoscopic Surgeon, and has received many teaching awards. After residency, he completed a three year fellowhip in reproductive endocrinology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York.  During his fellowship, Dr. Hurwitz successfully launched several research programs related to reproductive aging and diminished ovarian reserve and has presented his research findings at many leading national and international fertility conferences. His research interests also include premature ovarian failure, oocyte cryopreservation, reproductive surgeries, embryo donation, and bioethics. He has published numerous abstracts, articles and book chapters on reproductive aging, reproductive hormones, IVF, ultrasound, and bioethics. Dr. Hurwitz is a member of the Society of Reproductive Endocrinologists, Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. He is also currently Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Women’s Health at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Contact us to book an appointment with infertility specialist Dr. Hurwitz.


See interview clips of Dr. Hurwitz from “A Simple Dream,” a four-part series that explores science, surrogacy and a couple’s quest for a child from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Dr. Joshua Hurwitz | Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

 

PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) Program Leader

 

Dr. Hurwitz heads our PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) program, with his usual passion and dedication. 


“Too many of our patients come to us in their late 20’s or 30’s when they are having trouble getting pregnant,” says Dr. Joshua M. Hurwitz, who is leading the RMACT Pediatric Adolescent Program. “These patients have been suffering with PCOS symptoms for years, sometimes since puberty.  PCOS often goes undiagnosed, which leaves the patient vulnerable to frustration and long-term health issues.  We want to reach these patients earlier and help them manage their PCOS; we want to reach them in their teens.”

 

RMACT’s Adolescent PCOS Program provides a three-pronged approach for PCOS patients: nutrition, hormone management, and education. Early detection enables patients to manage their condition and limit the long-term affects of PCOS, including diabetes, heart disease, elevated cholesterol, endometrial cancer, hypertension, thyroid issues, sleep apnea, and later on, infertility. Each patient is cared for by a complete PCOS team: Dr. Joshua M. Hurwitz; Carolyn Gundell, M.S.; Monica Moore, nurse practitioner; Diana D’Amelio, RPA-C; Eloise Downs, registered nurse.

 

Contact us to book an appointment with infertility specialist Dr. Hurwitz.

 

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Medical Monday - Generations of PCOS, Our Daughters

  
  
  

Learning About PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome)

If you're the mother of a daughter, you probably have a few things in common. Maybe she has your smile. Or your chin. Or even you stubborness.

You may have PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome). You may not. If you do, there's a larger possibility that she has or will develop it as she grows older.

If you have a daughter that is showing symptoms or has been diagnosed with PCOS, learn more about it with experts from RMACT. They are specialists who are committed to knowing all the basic facts as well as the newest and most up-to-date research, data and treatment possibilities. 

Please read below for the information you will need to sign up for this free event open to the public. ~ Lisa Rosenthal

Fertility Seminars CTSponsored by RMA Connecticut

My Daughter has PCOS

A discussion to help parents understand PCOS and how best to manage it while supporting their daughter.

 

For: Parents or support persons of young adolescents/women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

 

Where: RMA of CT, 10 Glover Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06851

 

When: Wednesday, November 20, 2013, from 6:30-8:00 p.m.

 

Please RSVP by Tuesday 11/18 to: edowns@rmact.com


A light dinner will be provided. RSVP necessary for attendance and food order.  Call 203-750-7400 with questions.

 

What Is PCOS? Expert Panel Answers Many Questions

 

Topics our panel will address:


• What is PCOS?
• What are the specific concerns of PCOS in the teens / 20′s population?
• Why is management of PCOS important for long term physical and mental health?
• What is the latest research available related to diagnosing and managing PCOS?
• How can you best support your daughter—emotionally, medically, and socially?

 

Our panel will include our RMA of CT Staff:


Joshua Hurwitz, MD – Reproductive Endocrinologist
Melissa Kelleher, LCSW – Mental Health Specialist
Diana D’Amelio, RPA-C – Physician Assistant
Eloise Downs, BSN, RN – PCOS Nurse
Carolyn Gundell, MS – Nutritionist

 

Click to learn more about this PCOS support event.

 

Lisa Rosenthal's Google+

 

 

Infertility Means Your Period is Not Always the Point

  
  
  

Trouble Getting Pregnant and the Menstrual Cycle

Reproductive HealthIf you are having trouble getting pregnant, and you are lucky, you are continuing to get your period.

 

Why lucky to get your period when you're trying to get pregnant? Isn't the first sign of pregnancy not getting your period?

 

Your menstrual cycle is a sign of reproductive health. Getting your period regularly may mean that you are ovulating normally and/or producing an endometrial lining that is building and then shedding.

 

These are all indications of good reproductive health. While each of us mourns when we get our period, that once again we are not pregnant, still it is healthier than not getting it.

 

If you are not getting your period regularly or you have not gotten your period for months or even years at a time, you are in good company. Unfortunately, if you have PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) or other hormonal imbalances, not getting your period is more the norm than getting it.

 

Getting your period means that this month you are not pregnant.

 

Getting your period also means that your endometrial lining is shedding because your hormones and endocrine system are sending all the signals that are needed to set up your cycle for the following month.

Supporting Reproductive Health

I’m not a doctor and I’m not explaining this in a professional way. I’m not trying to. I’m reminding all of us that getting our period is almost always a sign of reproductive health.

 

That our bodies are working more properly than not.

 

If you are not getting your period, there is help available.


If you have PCOS or a hormonal imbalance, medications can regulate your system so that menstruating will occur more regularly. In no way does not getting your period mean that you are doomed to failure. Not at all. What it does mean is that there is a different path, an alternate route, that you will be following.

 

It all comes down to the same thing. Whether you are getting your period regularly and mourning it or not getting your period and mourning that, getting pregnant is a good possibility with the right help. Going to a board certified reproductive endocrinologist is the first step.  

 

Lisa Rosenthal's Google+

 

 

My Daughter Has PCOS | A Forum for Adults to Help Adolescents

  
  
  

I had a great blog planned for today. Brilliant, even.


Ah, well, it will have to wait. 


Because it SNOWED. And I do love the snow. 


Instead of my brilliant blog, which will have to wait until tomorrow, here's a reminder about the brand new event that RMACT has created to fill a real need in our community. If you know someone whose child might have PCOS, please pass this on. Many of us have struggled with undiagnosed PCOS, only to discover as adults that there were ways to have managed much more comfortably and safely with the symptoms and the health ramifications. 


So, please, pass the information on!

My daughter has PCOS:My Daughter Has PCOS 

Understanding PCOS and How to Manage It

A discussion to help parents or support persons of young women understand PCOS; how and why it is important to manage it; and how best to support their daughter.

 

Our RMA of CT Adolescent/Young Adult PCOS Program is planning to hold a PCOS Forum for the parents/guardians of adolescents and young adults with PCOS.

 

Here are a few topics topics our panel will discuss.

 

  • What is PCOS and what are the specific concerns of PCOS in the teenage and 20 something population?
  • Why is management of PCOS important for long term physical and mental health?
  • What is the latest research available related to diagnosing and managing PCOS?
  • How can you best support your daughter—emotionally, medically, and socially?

 

Join us for an informative panel presentation and Q&A time. Our panel will include our Staff Reproductive Endocrinologist, Psychologist, Physician Assistant, PCOS Nurse, and Nutritionist. Dinner will be provided. RSVP is necessary for attendance.


Please click here to register and attend.


Me, I'm out to shovel the snow. I love it! After that, my brilliant blog will emerge, ready to publish tomorrow. Join me then, won't you?

 


Healthy eating, PCOS and the holidays

  
  
  

I attended a wonderful seminar on Saturday at RMACT. All about food, fertility and the holidays. Carolyn Gundell, MS gave an interactive seminar to discuss healthy eating strategies over the holidays and beyond.  Carolyn has her M.S. in Nutrition from Columbia University and has over twenty years of experience working with patients with insulin resistance, Diabetes Type1/Type 2, and metabolic disorders including Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). Carolyn will be working with RMACT, giving patients another way to make healthy choices for themselves and enhance their possibility of conception. Many thanks to Monica Moore and Cori Cooper for their time, effort, energy and interest in bringing Carolyn to RMACT.

And right on time, because guess what? The holidays are here, in full force. That means lots of babies and children to be around who are not your own, which tends to evoke feelings of sadness. Emotional eating is one thing that occurs during the holidays, but Carolyn pointed out that if eating or weight issues were a matter of will power, there would be far less of us who were overweight. Carolyn provided some wonderful insight into managing eating when you are surrounded by choices that are less than healthy in ways designed to work.

So here are a few things that I can pass on from what I learned on Saturday.

Identify your triggers; food, people, occasions. It may be that it's almost impossible to be around certain foods. Or certain people cause a feeling of wanting to comfort through eating. And of course, certain occasions may be a place of "ritual" eating. (Eating the foods that have been served since you were a child; foods that were made just for you because they are your favorite; foods that you only eat at that party, once a year.) Being aware of triggers is a good first step.

Deprivation can cause more overeating as we feel that we are forbidden to have something. So perhaps have less, don't decide that it's a food that you absolutely cannot have.

One of my favorites is enough sleep. The recommendation is for us to sleep between seven and eight hours a night. There are certain hormones that are released that will make it easier to either lose or maintain weight. But only if you sleep enough. For me, I take it a step further and consider the idea of rest. Downtime. Not necessarily going to each and every party. Reading a book. Taking a nap. Walking with the dog. (Exercise is good too!)

Don't bring leftovers home and do give leftovers away. That way, whatever choices you make one day don't spill over into the next. It's easier to make different, healthier choices the next day, when the foods that you would not normally choose are not sitting front and center in your fridge.

Our next seminar is on January 12th on "Take Shape for Life" at 6:30 PM. On January 16th we will have a half day program complete with Yoga, Acupuncture and Nutrition. These programs were designed for you, our patient.

Here's what one patient had to say after Saturday's seminar:

RMA was recommended to me by a former patient. I had been to two previous places and was not successful in achieving my dream to become a mom. This former patient insisted I try. I became a patient in the summer of 2008. Even though I have been through 1 surgery and 4 unsuccessful IUI's, I still have faith in the care I receive. I am on break from shots..and etc.. I felt out of the loop since I have not been sitting in the waiting room and reading the latest happenings at RMA. I was cruising your website and found out about today's seminar about healthy eating during the holidays. I attended and appreciated the warmth and information I received today. I can't believe how RMA has put together so many resources for us. I think all of you are amazing.This blog is already a postive addition to RMA for me as a patient.
Posted @ Saturday, December 12, 2009 4:40 PM by Laura

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