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Path To Fertility Blogger Lisa Rosenthal  

Lisa Rosenthal has over twenty-five years of experience in the fertility field, including her current roles as Coordinator of Professional and Patient Communications for RMACT and teacher and founder of Fertile Yoga, a class designed to support, comfort and enhance men and women's sense of self. Her experience also includes working with RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association and The American Fertility Association, where she was Educational Coordinator, Conference Director and Assistant Executive Director

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CT Fertility Doctor Cynthia Murdock - Why Calm Demeanor Is Helpful

  
  
  

CT Fertility Doctor Cynthia Murdock On Being Calm

CT fertility doctor cynthia murdockReproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT)'s fertility doctor Cynthia Murdock, MD is one of the five board certified reproductive endocrinologists that we have on the RMACT team. Dr. Murdock sees patients in each of our four convenient locations: Norwalk, Danbury, Stamford and Trumbull.

 

When patients speak of Dr. Murdock, the most common term that is used is calm. Her patients, as well as the other physician’s patients, state that she rarely gets rattled or upset. Her calmness, it seems, is infectious, in the best possible way. 

When Trying to Conceive and Have a Healthy Pregnancy

Dr. Murdock’s excellent clinical and professional skills are paramount, of course. First, when one is trying to conceive and have a healthy pregnancy, you need the best possible medical care. Dr. Murdock provides that, and has provided that for many years in the state of Connecticut.

 

Given that her medical, surgical, diagnostic and therapeutic skills are excellent, award winning in fact, why does her demeanor matter? That’s not part of the job description or the skill set you need when you are struggling with infertility.

 

But isn’t it? Don’t you need someone to count on if the news and results that you are getting back are less than stellar or are outright disappointing? Isn’t it an amazing situation when the physician that you are counting on for clinical skills can also be the human being who calms the situation? How much calmer do we feel when we have a calm physician?

 

Much calmer. That’s the answer that I hear about Dr. Murdock, over and over again. Her patients tend to be more patient, less anxious, and more able to hear what they need to hear. I see this in Fertile Yoga and hear about this in Ladies Night In, as well as here on the PathtoFertility blog.

 

She explains things carefully and deliberately. She can find a way to describe even the most complicated procedure or protocol. Her voice is soothing, particularly when delivering bad news, yet she is able to embrace the good news as well. Her particular gift seems to be in giving information and having it be just that. Information. Not bad news. Her patients describe her delivery as comforting.

 

RMACT's Board Certified Reproductive Endocrinologists - Complete Disclosure

 

Complete disclosure. I have a tremendous amount of respect and affection for each and every one of our physicians at RMACT. Dr. Mark Leondires, our Medical Director. Dr. Spencer Richlin, our Surgical Director. Dr. Joshua Hurwitz, Division Director of REI at Danbury Hospital. Dr. Shaun Williams, newest addition to our team of board certified reproductive endocrinologists.

 

They each have the clinical and professional skills that make them great doctors and that help support the pregnancy rates at RMACT of which we are so proud. And they each have different personalities as well. Isn’t it a pleasure to go to a fertility practice where you can create a custom fit? That’s the beauty of a practice with more than one physician. You build a relationship with the physician that fits best for you.

 

Without a doubt, any of our fertility doctors can support your quest in becoming pregnant. They all have the medical skills. Like every other human being on earth, they also have personalities. They are each genuine and caring people.

 

Dr. Murdock’s sub-specialty is calm. Constant, unflappable calm. It’s very reassuring to the patients that she sees. After all, calm is so very encouraging when one is in the midst of emotional chaos, which can often be the case while in the midst of fertility treatment.

 

Read more in coming weeks about our other physicians.

 

For today, the word is calm.

 

Take it as easy as possible today everyone. And please remember, we're here to help.

 

 

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Bleeding in Pregnancy-CT Fertility Specialist Cynthia Murdock Speaks Out

  
  
  

Bleeding in Pregnancy

RMACT LogoSome subjects don't change quickly, or even look as though they are changing very much at all. Especially feelings. Medical treatments change constantly and sometimes very rapidly. Feelings tend to lag behind. 


One thing that hasn't changed in the twenty-five years that I have been participating in the infertility/fertility community is early bleeding in pregnancy. It still happens. It still happens often.


And I think it's safe to say that most, if not almost all of us, panic when we see the blood. There are women out there who do not panic and if you are one of them, so happy that you meet this type of situation with calm and equanimity. Would love to know how you have achieved that sense of serenity in your life, please share.


For a lot of us, panic is a very common reaction to seeing any blood, staining or spotting. You may not feel it. You may feel it very strongly. That sense that the pregnancy you have worked so hard for is slipping away. That a miscarriage is imminent. And that there is nothing that you can do.


Dr. Cynthia Murdock, award winning board certified reproductive endocrinologist at RMACT, and Castle Connolly Top Doctor in the field of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, talks to us here about what to expect if you are experiencing bleeding in your pregnancy.  ~ Lisa Rosenthal

CT Fertility Specialist Speaks Out

If I had to choose one single problem which causes the mostDr. Cynthia Murdock, Reproductive Medicine Associates of CT stress and anxiety among our patients, I would say that it is bleeding in early pregnancy. The official medical terminology for this is first trimester bleeding. Nothing is worse than working so hard to achieve a pregnancy only to discover that you are bleeding. The first thought that enters everyone’s mind is “I am losing this pregnancy”.

 

All bleeding should be evaluated with a blood test to check estrogen and progesterone levels, and an ultrasound to rule out any bleeding in the uterus. Most often when the bleeding is light we may not find a reason for the bleeding, but luckily most light bleeding episodes are limited to 1-2 days. Common recommendations are abstinence from sexual intercourse. In some cases of heavy bleeding we may ask you to decrease your activity level, but there is no evidence that this will prevent a miscarriage.

 

Luckily we have some positive news on this front. First of all, approximately 25% of all women have bleeding in the first trimester of pregnancy. A recent large study of over 4,000 women revealed that of the 25% of women who have bleeding, only 8% have heavy bleeding (defined as more than a normal menstrual bleed). The majority of  women (92%) who have bleeding, have only light bleeding (less than a menstrual period) or spotting. The good news is that women with only light bleeding or spotting are at no increased risk for a pregnancy loss. The not-so-good news is that women who experience heavy bleeding have a 3-fold increase in the risk of miscarriage. The most important messages that we can take home from this study are that first trimester bleeding is common, and that greater than 90% of women with first trimester bleeding are at no increased risk for a miscarriage.

 

Remember bleeding is common, but luckily most of the time it poses no risk to the pregnancy. Call your nurse so you can be evaluated but don’t panic!

 

About Dr. Cynthia Murdock

 

Dr. Murdock earned a BA in biology at Cornell University and an MD at Creighton University School of Medicine where she graduated magna cum laude. She completed her residency at Creighton University Medical Center where she was named Berlex Best Teaching Resident. In 2003 she completed a fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at the National Institutes of Health.

 

An experienced researcher, Dr. Murdock has contributed to numerous peer-reviewed studies and presented at several of the most prestigious conferences in the field of reproductive medicine. The focus of much of her research has been on estrogen receptors, hypothalamic neuron function, and precocious puberty.

 

Dr. Murdock is a member of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, as well as a Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

 

Dr. Murdock was previously an assistant clinical professor at Creighton University School of Medicine and a staff physician with Reproductive Health Specialists at Nebraska Methodist Hospital. She has also served as an Assistant Professor of OB-GYN at the National Naval Medical Center and Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

 

Dr. Murdock is now a staff physician and a fertility specialist in Reproductive Medicine at RMACT. She is board-certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology and in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility.

 

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CT Fertility Clinic Celebrates 5 Top Doctors

  
  
  

Five Top Doctors At Our CT Fertility Clinic

CT Fertility Clinic Top DoctorsWhen I say I work for the best fertility doctors in Connecticut, people hearing my words probably think I'm biased. In fact though, their peers agree, they are top doctors according to Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. (See below.) That's not me saying it, that's other doctors in Connecticut saying it. 


Clinically, they are excellent, hence their awards. Drs. Mark Leondires, Spencer Richlin, Joshua Hurwitz, Cynthia Murdock and Shaun Williams are a dedicated group of physicians intent on providing the very best fertility treatment possible. Our pregnancy rates are outstanding and are continuing to rise due to innovative and scientific advancements and a fertility program willing to move past accepted ways to treat infertility and sub-fertility. We have doctors who respect what we have learned in the last several decades and are also open to new, research-driven techniques. They are neither bound mindlessly to the past nor are they jumping unquestioningly into new, unproven protocols. 


All that and more. Dedicated to creating a program that treats men and women like human beings and not walking fertility diagnoses; we have created teams. Each patient has an award winning, board certified reproductive endocrinologist, plus a nurse coordinator, plus a patient navigator, plus a financial representative. These teams are put together to ensure that each patient at RMACT knows who to ask questions of and who is responsible for their fertility treatment. While patients may get treated as a number in other fertility programs, they most certainly are not treated that way at RMACT.


RMACT takes other steps as well to ensure that patients are taken care of; the Integrated and Fertility Wellness Program offers many free and co-pay dependant services for both patients and non-patients. Mental health professionals offer counseling and coaching so that men and women can thrive during fertility treatment, not simply survive. Our acupuncturists have almost a decade of experience working in both traditional and laser treatments. Our nutritionist, who one can see for a co-pay, creates individualized and specific plans for each and every patient that she sees and has made a big difference in patients reducing fertility-affecting lifestyle choices. Fertile Yoga is offered three days a week, in three separate locations, free of charge, reducing stress and increasing quality of life while in fertility treatment.


Please read below about our award winning doctors. How lovely and affirming that other physicians confirm what we all ready know; that the doctors at RMACT are dedicated to their patients and helping them become pregnant, with fertility treatment and compassion and hope. 

All Fertility Doctors at RMACT Named Top Doctors

Castle Connolly Medical Ltd., which conducts a rigorous, peer-reviewed assessment of local doctors, compiles the list of Top Doctors to help patients find the best healthcare providers. All five fertility doctors at Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) are Top Doctors, as decided by their peers in the medical field.

 

Excellence in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

 

Fertiity Doctor Mark LeondiresDr. Mark Leondires, medical director and fertility specialist at RMACT, was selected in 2013 as a Castle Connolly Regional Top Doctor for his work the field of reproductive endocrinology and infertility. Among Dr. Leondires’ accolades, he was selected in 2012 and 2013 for Best Doctors in America, a database of the country’s top five percent of physicians, as chosen through a peer-review process. 

 

Prior to joining RMACT, Dr. Leondires served as the Director of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) at the Combined Federal Program for Reproductive Endocrinology. While under his direction, the ART Program was one of the most successful in the Washington DC area and in the top tenth percentile nationally. During this time he was an Assistant Professor at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences and clinical faculty for the Combined Fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology. His professional society memberships include the Society of Reproductive Endocrinologists, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

 

Fertility Specialist Cynthia MurdockDr. Cynthia Murdock, a fertility specialist at RMACT, was also selected in 2013 as a Castle Connolly Top Doctor in the field of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. Dr. Murdock was chosen by her peers as one of Connecticut’s top fertility specialists based on her outstanding work with patients who need help getting pregnant and building their families.

 

An experienced researcher, Dr. Murdock has contributed to numerous peer-reviewed studies and presented at several of the most prestigious conferences in the field of reproductive medicine. The focus of much of her research has been on estrogen receptors, hypothalamic neuron function, and precocious puberty. Dr. Murdock is a member of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, as well as a Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Murdock was previously an assistant clinical professor at Creighton University School of Medicine and a staff physician with Reproductive Health Specialists at Nebraska Methodist Hospital. She has also served as an Assistant Professor of OB-GYN at the National Naval Medical Center and Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

 

CT Fertility Specialist Dr. Joshua Hurtwitz   Top DoctorDr. Joshua M. Hurwitz, a partner at RMACT, was also selected in 2013 as a Castle Connolly Top Doctor in the field of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. Since joining RMACT seven years ago, he has helped thousands of patients realize their dreams of having a baby.

 

In addition to his responsibilities with RMACT, Dr. Hurwitz is Division Director of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (REI) services in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences of Danbury Hospital, where he has been teaching residents during his entire tenure. He is also an Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. During residency training, Dr. Hurwitz was named Best Laparoscopic Surgeon, and has received many teaching awards. He is a member of the Society of Reproductive Endocrinologists, Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

 

Top Docs of Fairfield County

 

Two of the Board Certified reproductive endocrinologists of RMACT – Dr. Spencer Richlin, Surgical Director and Fertility Specialist, and Dr. Shaun Williams, fertility specialist – have been honored by their peers by being rated “Top Docs” of Fairfield County in 2014.

 

Infertility Specialist Dr. Spencer RichlinDr. Spencer Richlin, who made the Castle Connolly list for the third consecutive year, is a partner with RMACT. “My patients, whether they are couples, oncology patients or single women, all have the same dream – to have a family,” says Dr. Richlin, who is the Division Chief of Reproductive Endocrinology and Fertility at Norwalk Hospital along with his responsibilities at RMACT. “This intuitive human need is powerful, and I’m proud to help them have the families they dream of.”

 

Dr. Richlin is a member of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) and of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). He has published several articles and is on the writing committee for the upcoming 2015 Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility PROLOG sponsored by the ACOG.

 

Dr. Shaun WilliamsDr. Shaun Williams’ peers also rated him as a “Top Doctor” for Castle Connolly’s 2013 list of Fairfield County’s Top Doctors. “This award speaks to the hard work and care of our entire team,” says Dr. Williams, who joined the RMACT team in 2012. “I’m proud of our team’s success rates and that we are helping patients to improve their overall health through nutrition, stress management, and of course advanced medical treatment.”

 

Dr. Williams has been published numerous times, and has presented five of his abstracts at American Society of Reproductive Medicine’s annual conference for professionals in the infertility field. He is a member of ASRM, Fairfield County Medical Association, Fellow of American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and associate member of Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. 

 

 

Anyone out there agree about our wonderful doctors? Care to share a few words? We would love to hear from you! ~Lisa Rosenthal

 

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RMA's CT Fertility Specialist, Cynthia Murdock, MD, Named Top Doctor

  
  
  

Castle Connolly Top Doctors Named: CT Fertility Specialist Cynthia Murdock, MD

CT Fertility Specialist Dr. Cynthia Murdock Top DoctorSome news is too good to keep to oneself. Our own CT Fertility Specialist Dr. Cynthia Murdock being selected as a Castle Connolly Top Doctor in the field of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility is one of those pieces of news. You can read below about all the specifics about Dr. Murdock's award. 


All I know is what I hear from my Fertile Yoga students and from our patients at Ladies Night In. And that is that Dr. Murdock listens. And she answers questions. And she is encouraging. And she is dedicated and professional. And she cares a lot about helping them get pregnant. 


That's what I hear about Dr. Murdock. And that she shows up, every day, dedicated to her patients and helping them create their families. 


Read below for more. ~Lisa Rosenthal

Castle Connolly Top Doctor in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

NORWALK, CT (July 23, 2013) – Dr. Cynthia Murdock, a fertility specialist at Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT), has been selected as a Castle Connolly Top Doctor in the field of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. Castle Connolly Medical Ltd., which conducts a rigorous, peer-reviewed assessment of local doctors, compiles the list of Top Doctors to help patients find the best healthcare providers.  Dr. Murdock was chosen by her peers as one of Connecticut’s top fertility specialists based on her outstanding work with patients who need help getting pregnant and building their families.

 

"Working with fertility patients gives me the opportunity to use sophisticated medicine and science to make a difference in their lives,” says Dr. Murdock, who is board certified in both Reproductive Endocrinology and Obstetrics and Gynecology.  “To me, this award recognizes the importance of successful fertility treatment to my patients.”

 

Dr. Murdock earned a BA in biology at Cornell University and an MD at Creighton University School of Medicine where she graduated magna cum laude. She completed her residency at Creighton University Medical Center where she was named Berlex Best Teaching Resident. In 2003 she completed a fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at the National Institutes of Health. An experienced researcher, Dr. Murdock has contributed to numerous peer-reviewed studies and presented at several of the most prestigious conferences in the field of reproductive medicine. The focus of much of her research has been on estrogen receptors, hypothalamic neuron function, and precocious puberty.

 

Dr. Murdock is a member of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, as well as a Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Murdock was previously an assistant clinical professor at Creighton University School of Medicine and a staff physician with Reproductive Health Specialists at Nebraska Methodist Hospital. She has also served as an Assistant Professor of OB-GYN at the National Naval Medical Center and Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

 

About Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT):

RMACT specializes in the treatment of infertility, including assisted reproductive technologies (ART) such as intrauterine insemination (IUI), in-vitro fertilization (IVF), and Comprehensive Chromosomal Screening (CCS). RMACT, Fairfield County’s largest fertility clinic and egg donation center, is one of 11 leading In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) centers nationwide chosen by In Vitro Sciences to participate in its Centers of Excellence program. RMACT has offices in Norwalk, Danbury, Stamford and Trumbull, and affiliate New York fertility clinics serving Putnam and Dutchess counties. RMACT also offers infertility treatment financing and support services, such as nutrition counseling, massage therapy, psychological counseling, acupuncture and yoga, through RMACT Integrated Fertility and Wellness Center.

 

The RMACT team includes lead physicians Drs. Mark P. Leondires, Spencer S. Richlin and Joshua M. Hurwitz, as well as fertility specialists Drs. Cynthia M. Murdock and Shaun C. Williams. All physicians are Board-Certified Reproductive Endocrinologists and are members of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) and the Fairfield County and Connecticut Medical Societies. RMACT’s IVF laboratory is accredited by the College of American Pathologists (CAP), and CLIA; other accreditations include the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) and the American Institute for Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM). For more information visit www.RMACT.com or find us on Facebook.

 

Award Winning Fertility Doctor(s) at RMACT

  
  
  

Reproductive Endocrinologist, Dr. Cynthia Murdock Won the 2012 Patients' Choice Award

Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut is very proud of having five board certified reproductive endocrinologistsDr. Cynthia Murdock has won an award, not surprisingly, based on patient reviews and ratings. She is known for her professionalism as well as her compassion. Read on to hear more about her and RMACT other award winning fertility specialists.

 

 

Fertility Doctor - Dr. Cynthia MurdockDr. Cynthia Murdock of Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) has earned the “Patients’ Choice 2012” award, which is given to only five percent of the nation’s 870,000 active physicians and dentists. This award is tabulated by PatientsChoice.org based on patient reviews and ratings on care and service on websites such as Vitals.com.

 

The Patients' Choice Award is No Easy Feat 

Millions of patients go online each year to rate their doctors on various components of care, including accuracy of their diagnosis, the amount of time they spent with the doctor, and the doctor's bedside manner and follow-up care. Patients' Choice reviews these rankings and other quality measures to compile its yearly list of award winners. Dr. Murdock joins her RMACT colleagues Drs. Spencer Richlin and Joshua M. Hurwitz, who also received this award.

 

 

“I try to work with my patients as a woman, a mom and a doctor,” says Dr. Murdock. “Each of these three perspectives is helpful when developing their unique infertility treatment plan. That relationship and helping them start a family is rewarding on its own, so being recognized by my patients with this award is extraordinary.”

 

 

Dr. Murdock earned a BA in biology at Cornell University and an MD at Creighton University School of Medicine where she graduated magna cum laude. She completed her residency at Creighton University Medical Center where she was named Berlex Best Teaching Resident. In 2003 she completed a fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at the National Institutes of Health.

 

 

An experienced researcher, Dr. Murdock has contributed to numerous peer-reviewed studies and presented at several of the most prestigious conferences in the field of reproductive medicine. The focus of much of her research has been on estrogen receptors, hypothalamic neuron function, and precocious puberty.

 

 

Dr. Murdock is a member of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, as well as a Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

 

 

 

 

 

Infertility Basics- A Reminder About The Simple Things In Life

  
  
  

Infertility Basics- Frequently asked questions, answered by RMACT board certified reproductive endocrinolgists

Read below what the medical director of Reproductive Medicine Associates of RMACT- Board certified reproductive endocrinologists- Dr's Hurwitz, Richlin, Leondires and MurdockConnecticut (RMACT) and the team of board certified reproductive endocrinologists in the program have to say about frequently asked questions.

 

"Infertility can be confusing, and people frequently ask questions because they want to know if they should seek help from a fertility specialist," says Dr. Mark Leondires, Medical Director.  "The questions and answers below are intended to give some basic knowledge.  Many couples put off seeing a fertility specialist when they are having trouble getting pregnant, but they are typically reassured after being diagnosed and starting a treatment plan."


What is infertility?

Infertility is a disease or condition of the reproductive system often diagnosed after a couple has had one year of unprotected, well-timed intercourse, or if the woman has been unable to carry a pregnancy that results in a live birth.

 

Is infertility a "women's problem"?

Infertility is a medical problem. Approximately 35% of infertility is due to a female factor and 35% is due to a male factor. In the balance of cases, infertility results from problems in both partners or the cause of the infertility cannot be explained.

 

How long should we try before we see a doctor?

In general, if you are less than 35 years old and have been trying for more than one year you should schedule an appointment with a fertility specialist. If you are greater than 35 years old we would like to see you after at least six months of timed, unprotected intercourse. However, if you have a reason to suspect you may have a problem getting pregnant such as a history of pelvic inflammatory disease, painful periods, miscarriage, irregular menstrual cycles, or if your partner has a low sperm count, you should seek help sooner. Many couples have a hard time admitting that there may be an infertility problem, but be reassured there are often many things we can do to help.

 

What is a Fertility Specialist?

A fertility specialist, or Reproductive Endocrinologist, is a medical doctor who has been specially trained in the complex issues that can contribute to infertility. In addition to being trained as an Obstetrician/Gynecologist which requires a four-year residency a fertility specialist must complete an additional two to three year fellowship in reproductive endocrinology.  This fellowship training is highly specialized to focus on the diagnosis and treatment of infertility and  female endocrinology.. A physician can become Board Certified in Reproductive Endocrinology by successfully completing the fellowship as well as written and oral examinations.

 

Currently in the Unites States, there are only about 1,000 Board Certified Reproductive Endocrinologists. Specifically for infertility related to males, Urologists with a sub-specialty in Andrology are the most qualified experts as they have often completed two-year fellowships and passed exams to become Board Certified in Andrology.

 

At what time of the month is a woman fertile?

The most fertile time of a woman's cycle is just before or the of day ovulation. Ovulation usually occurs two weeks before a period starts, so it is necessary to count backwards from the anticipated start of the next period in order to find the most fertile time. Take the number of days in the usual cycle (from the beginning of one period to the beginning of the next) and subtract 14. For example, a woman with a 32-day period would likely ovulate around day 18 (32-14=18), while a woman with a 28-day cycle would ovulate around day 14 (28-14=14). We recommend every other day intercourse around the day of ovulation. That would mean days 12, 14 and 16 for women with 28 days cycles.

 

It is best to have intercourse before ovulation rather than afterwards, so a woman who ovulates on day 14 would have a good chance of conceiving if she has intercourse on either day 13 or 14. For women with irregular cycles you can extend the period of having sexual relations to every other day from day 11 to 18 ( 11-13-15-17).  In order to better understand what day you ovulate take your average menstrual cycle length (for example 32 days) and subtract 14 and that will give you that day you ovulate around (that would be about day 18).  Therefore you would have relations days 15-17&19 to cover all your bases.


Alternatively, women with irregular cycles may want to use an ovulation predictor kit, which can be purchased over the counter at most local pharmacies. This involves testing your urine around the time of ovulation using a detector stick, which give you a visual reading. Additionally, there are electronic monitors which detect ovulation by tracking two hormones (estrogen and luteinizing hormone) starting with urine testing on day one of your menstrual cycle. The methods that utilize urine predictor sticks or urine ovulation detector machines are usually highly sensitive, accurate, and reliable.

 

How can a woman tell if she ovulates?

The simple, inexpensive way of finding out the approximate time of your ovulation is to take your basal temperature (that is, your body temperature at rest) every morning and record it on a chart. You can buy a Basal Body Thermometer at your local drug store. Save all your charts so you can review them with your doctor. Three or four months of charting should be adequate. If your temperature goes up after the middle of your menstrual month you likely do ovulate. In general you ovulate about two days prior to the temperature rise.

 

How often should we have intercourse?

It is a good idea to have intercourse every other day around the time you ovulate. Remember, every woman is different, and may not ovulate exactly on "Day 14." And, just because you ovulated on "Day 14" this month, doesn't mean you will next month. It is preferable to have intercourse every other day rather than every day so that sufficient sperm will be available. To increase your chances of the egg becoming fertilized, do not douche or use lubricants immediately before having intercourse.

 

What fertility testing should our fertility doctor perform?

Your doctor will likely do the following:

  • Blood tests to check reproductive hormone levels in the woman; estradiol (E2), progesterone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), thyroid hormone, prolactin, and possibly male hormone levels.
  • Complete semen analysis on the male partner
  • Hysterosalpingogram (HSG), an x-ray exam to evaluate if the woman's fallopian tubes are open
  • Ultrasound to confirm the normal appearance of your uterus and ovaries in the woman

What about smoking and drinking alcohol and caffeine?

There is evidence linking reproductive impairment with exposure to alcohol, tobacco, and caffeine.

Alcohol and tobacco use have been demonstrated to affect the reproductive capacities of both men and women, and tobacco is an especially potent reproductive toxin that negatively effects female fertility by damaging eggs. In men there is a direct effect on sperm quantity, quality, and reproductive function. In general we ask that women consume less than 150 mg of caffeine per day which is equivalent to two small 8 oz cups per day. Remember sodas and tea also contain caffeine. In addition, it is wise to be in the best physical shape possible while you attempt to conceive and, of course, to ensure a healthy pregnancy and baby.

 

Are hot tubs really bad for a man?

Yes. High temperatures can damage sperm. That is why the scrotum is located outside the body - to act as a kind of "refrigerator" to keep the sperm cool. So, it is a good idea to avoid hot tubs, saunas, and steam rooms when men are trying to help in the pregnancy pathway.

 

What else can we do?

Learn as much as you can about infertility.

  • Get and read good, reliable information (not just from popular magazines) from your doctor, library, or trusted friends or family.
  • RESOLVE (http://www.resolve.org/) and the American Fertility Association (AFA - www.theafa.org) has over 60 fact sheets on different topics related to infertility, and support groups in many areas.
  • Also visit the ASRM (http://www.asrm.com/), SART (http://www.sart.org/), ACOG (www.acog.org) and CDC (http://www.cdc.gov/) web sites for more information.

 


Top Fertility Doctor Reveals Truth on Infertility and Birth Control

  
  
  

Wednesday Text

Top Fertility Doctor: Cynthia Murdock, MD on Infertility and Birth Control

Dr. Murdock is a board-certified Reproductive Endocrinologist at Reproductive Medicine Associates of CT and talks with us about infertility and birth control. Top Fertility Doctor, Cynthia Murdock, MD, Board Certified Reproductive Endocrinologist at Reproductive Medicine Associates of CT

 

Recently I was reading an article about the 50th anniversary of the birth control pill.  The pill has represented freedom for women, freedom to choose when to have children and how many, freedom to control their lives and have careers that they might not have been able to prior to the advent of the pill.  Recently, however, the pill seems to have gotten a bad rap.  Now it seems that the pill is also to blame for the so-called “epidemic of infertility”.  Boldly stated in the center of the article was the following statement “The Pill didn’t create the field of infertility medicine, but it turned it into an enormous industry.”

Birth Control and Infertility

Let’s take a look at the facts.  When we look at the causes of infertility they fall into 4 categories.

 

  1. Thirty-five percent of cases are due to anatomic problems; this category would include blocked fallopian tubes, scarring in the pelvis, and problems with the uterus. 
  2. Twenty percent of cases are due to anovulation. 
  3. Thirty-five percent of cases are due to the male partner.
  4. Ten percent are idiopathic, meaning all tests are run and everything is normal.  Many cases of age-related infertility fall into this group.

 

         We know that there is an age-related decline in fertility.  Using birth-control to delay childbearing increases the average age of women attempting to conceive.  Women over 35 should seek an evaluation for infertility after 6 months of attempting to make sure none of the other causes are present.  Women who are having difficulty achieving a pregnancy have enough feelings of guilt without being made to feel it is somehow their fault for delaying childbearing and taking the pill.  We know that very often the cause is more complex than that. 

 

            More women are seeking fertility care, not because they took the pill, but because more and better care is available today, and because infertility does not carry the same stigma that it once did.  Thirty years ago if a couple couldn’t conceive there were very few options available to them, and even less support or discussion about it.  Today we are able to talk more freely, and able to treat many more complex fertility problems than ever before. Also, referencing the causes above, age related infertility still only accounts for perhaps ten per cent of all infertility. This would hardly constitute an epidemic.

 

            Remember the pill is a medication that most would argue has forever changed women’s lives for the better.  Let’s stop the guilt and blame game and wish the pill a happy 50th birthday!

Infertility and Sexuality- How is it Possible?

  
  
  

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Let's face it, infertility does not make anyone feel sexy. In fact, quite the opposite. Knowing that the anatomy is not cooperating does not make the heart, the mind or the libido feel confident or upbeat.

 

The whole concept that any of us are "less than" because of infertility does enter into this conversation. We are "less than" women or men because our reproductive system does not function perfectly normally.

 

We all know this isn't true. We do. But secretly, past our brains, in our heart, we feel that this is true. That without the ability to do easily, that which we were designed to do, that we are less than men and women.

 

After all, we were made to have babies. Women have wider hips made for childbearing, uteruses specially designed, menstrual cycles that ebb and flow in time with the moon and much, much more. Men make sperm, regularly, so as to have a fresh, healthy supply. They have errections so that the sperm can be placed in an optimal place for a woman to become pregnant.

 

Really though. How many of us ever only use our sexual organs when we want to have a child? Anyone? If our reproductive organs were only designed to reproduce, then why were they also designed to have the most sensitive tissue in the body? So that we could have sex every two years? Really? Come on. Doesn't make sense to me.

 

What does make sense to me is how most of us do operate in the real world. We have sex because it's enjoyable, because it creates intimacy, because it's a release. Not just because we want to have a baby and certainly, for most of us, not just WHEN we want to have a baby.

 

So is it possible to take reproduction out of sex? Infertility challenges will often do that for you. Often, in fertility treatment, we don't have to have sex to become pregnant, or only when prescribed. We are actually allowed to have sex almost whenever we want. Not a bad prescription actually.

 

It comes down to this. We take sex and intimacy out of infertility and treatment. Our feelings of being less than drain our libidos. Instead of enjoyment, sex and intimacy is a reminder of what our bodies are not cooperating with.

 

I'm not going to give you any easy answers here. As usual, I ask questions, try to raise awareness and ask you to ask questions.

 

Not being able to conceive is a tremendous heartache. Period. It made me sad when having sex with my husband was so drastically affected as well. Perhaps you have this in your life. If so, consider what can be done so that the losses around infertility don't start piling up too high.

 

Tomorrow, read what Dr. Cynthia Murdock wrote for you about infertility and birth control. And on Thursday, we'll resume the conversation about infertility and sexuality. If you have had problems responding to this blog, please try again. If you continue to have problems, please email me directly and let me know. lrosenthal@rmact.com

Fertility Seminar- Infertility, Hunger, Weight and Holiday Season

  
  
  

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The Holiday season is here. Maybe you believe that it doesn’t begin until Thanksgiving. For me, Halloween ushers in the roller coaster of up’s and down’s that don’t end until after the beginning of January. The almost endless gatherings and celebrations for family and friends.

A time where it feels impossible to get away from the questions, comments and uncomfortable silences. The questions are eerily similar, regardless of your ethnic background or religion. The questions conform easily to those asked of an investigative reporter. Who, what, where, why and when.

Children.

Who is having them. (Not us right now!)

What are we waiting for? (Ummm…. For it to happen???)

Where do we fit as a family, marriage, partnership without them? (Perhaps the loneliest question to wonder about.)

Why aren’t we pregnant yet? (Made me burst into tears on more than one occasion.)

When are we going to give our parents the grandchildren they are hoping and wanting? No one’s getting any younger! (In case infertility is not challenging enough, let’s throw a little guilt at it!)

How sad is it that those are only a single variation on a theme that most of us are very familiar with. It’s very possible to create scores of different questions based on the 5 W’s above; all pierce the heart of those of us trying to build our families.

Holidays are also a great time to gain weight. For a few of us, that’s a plus. For many of us, not so much. Dr. Cynthia Murdock and Carolyn Gundell, MS, (both from RMACT) will be speaking at the seminar this weekend, open to the public. Information on how to attend is below.

What I can share about this seminar is that last year I made sure to attend as I was tired of the eat too much, gain weight, feel guilty, have to lose weight holiday season. Carolyn spoke eloquently and compassionately about the issues around hunger, food, weight and the holidays; she gave realistic, helpful and new outlooks on how to cope with all reasons that I had for gaining weight. What I know is that I gained no weight during the holidays last year. In fact, I lost two pounds.

I’ll be there this year. Hope to see you there as well.

Fall 2010 Fertility Seminar Series 

Seminars held at our Norwalk office: 10 Glover Avenue, Norwalk, CT

Please check our website or call to confirm date, time and/or location as they are subject to change

Saturday November 13th                              11:00 AM -12:30 PM

Taking the Guilt and “Weight” Out of Holiday Eating

The Holidays can be filled with warm memories, family and friends, but are often stressful due to endless delicious food tasting opportunities.  This seminar will provide you with a non-dieting, guilt free approach to holiday eating - share in recipe ideas and tips on how to get through the holidays without the typical 10 lb weight gain.  Led by Carolyn Gundell, MS and Cynthia Murdock, MD

Infertility Specialist, Dr. Cynthia Murdock, Shares Personal Side

  
  
  

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Recently, I had the privilage to conduct a personal interview with Dr. Cynthia Murdock, board certified reproductive endocrinologist from Reproductive Medicine Associates of CT (RMACT). Dr. Murdock is one of four physicians with RMACT and the first to be interviewed here, for our blog. It was a pleasure to get to know her a little better through her thoughtful answers and her willingness to share her more personal side.

Board-Certified Reproductive Endocrinologist & Infertility Specialist - Dr. Cynthia Murdock: Speaks Personally

Dr. Cynthia Murdock, Board Certified Reproductive Endocrinologist from RMACT

 

  1. What drew you to the field of infertility?
    I was attracted to the combination of cutting-edge science and  the strong doctor-patient interactions that are formed. 
  2. What are the things that you would like to see evolve in treatment of infertility?  At this point, I think the next big step in IVF is going to be the development of better and better ways to choose the best single embryo to transfer.  Hopefully the day will soon be here that we can dramatically increase pregnancy rates and dramatically reduce the risk of multiples.  I believe that we are getting closer to this goal every day.
  3. What appeals to you most about being a doctor? 
    As a physician, you are exposed to people from all walks of life.  I feel that this is a real privilege. You have intimate contact with people who are outside of your immediate social sphere, I think this makes for a richer life experience.
  4. What is the one thing that you would like your patients to know about going through treatment? 
    Patients often ask “will I be able to have a baby?”  The answer is almost always YES.  Sometimes this may involve options or treatments that you didn’t think about initially, and at times the financial aspects may be difficult, but we are willing to stick with you through your family-building journey no matter where it takes you.
  5. Tell us something you would like every patient to know about you.
    I really enjoy working in my yard, I like the physicality and the sense of accomplishment.  I love taking the dog for walks around the neighborhood with my daughter.  This is the time I talk to her about her friends and school.  It’s good exercise for the dog as well. Personal questions
  6. What kind of things do you like to do in your spare time?  Mostly I like to spend time with my daughter and my husband.  Anything that involves being outside…even in winter!
  7. If you could travel anywhere in the world in the next month or so, where would you like to go?
    This summer I was fortunate enough to go to the Galapagos Islands a place I have always wanted to go.  I guess if I could go anywhere I would go to Antarctica..if I could get 2 weeks off work!
  8. Who is your favorite author?
    I love reading, but I don’t have a favorite author.  I would say that the 2 books that have left the most lasting impression on me are “Love in the Time of Cholera” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez and “The Road” by Cormac McCarthy
  9. Favorite genre of movie?
    Don’t have a favorite, not really a movie-goer at this point in my life
  10. If your schedule allowed for an unexpected few hours free, what would you do with them?
    Spend them with my daughter
  11. What is your favorite ethnic food?
    Indian
  12. If you could sit down for lunch with two people, living or not, who would they be?
    I am most interested in how regular people really lived in past societies.  I would want to meet with a middle class woman from Ancient Rome and ask her about her every day life.  Also I think it would be fascinating to meet someone from the stone age and learn what life was really like then.

 

 


 
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